CEB Jobs & Careers in Washington, DC

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19 days ago

Business Development/Account Management Associate- DC

Corporate Executive Boards Arlington, VA

We offer a sales training program designed to support on-the-job activities. This curriculum will provide you with the essential skills and business… Glassdoor


9 days ago

Business Operations Associate

Corporate Executive Boards Arlington, VA

include, but are not limited to: • Working with the product leadership team and internal business partners to build dashboards and track overall… Glassdoor


13 hrs ago

Junior User Experience (UX) Designer – new

Corporate Executive Boards Arlington, VA

This is a great opportunity for an UX designer, early in his or her career, to further develop their design, project management, and business skills… Glassdoor


10 days ago

Recruiting Coordinator

Corporate Executive Boards Arlington, VA

• Coordinate all interview details with candidates, recruiters, hiring managers and referrals • Manage CEBs temporary staffing process… Glassdoor


CEB Reviews

512 Reviews
3.2
512 Reviews
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CEB Chairman and CEO Thomas L. Monahan III
Thomas L. Monahan III
310 Ratings
  1. 2 people found this helpful  

    Incompetent managers, politics will stifle or delay your professional growth here

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Business Development Specialist  in  Washington, DC (US)
    Current Employee - Business Development Specialist in Washington, DC (US)

    I have been working at CEB full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    By working at CEB, you will receive opportunities to interact with senior executives and decision makers on the first day, which is great for the resume. Across the firm, you generally will work with smart, ambitious people getting their first start and/or people that have risen through the ranks to be pretty successful. Research staff get the opportunity to conduct well-received studies and analyses as well as receive a stamp on the resume for grad school proving they are smart. Advisory staff get good C-suite interaction and customer service delivery experience (work also isn't as arduous as research). Sales staff (Sales Executive and up only) can make decent money relatively early in their careers and enjoy good camaraderie. Solutions staff work in a "startup culture" and are the only staff that work off a standard mgmt. consulting business model. People are young and there is decent energy in the office. CEB also carries a good reputation in DC and in consulting circles if you want to stay in the area and/or industry. They put people in top 15 business programs, law programs, etc. (more so for research and advisory--not sales). The company is also so broad in its offerings that there are many frontiers you can explore in terms of management advisory services. Great place for someone who is a bit uncertain of his or her professional interests and who needs an environment to be exposed to a lot while drilling down to something more specific.

    Cons

    By having some managers serving as young as 27 years old without the necessary skills, training or experience under their belt, frontline and entry-level employees bear the brunt of incompetency and must "train the manager" or devise a subtle strategy for achieving their professional goals. Politics are rampant and impact promotions, internal transfers, and career growth opportunities. The sales and account management staff now have a formalized training program, but some sales employees in specific departments don't enjoy these benefits (meaning they need to figure things out trial and error). Entry level sales staff also endure a challenging job description (anywhere from 15-100 cold call dials a day, scheduling meetings on Outlook, and data entry in SFDC) for very weak incentive compensation. The BDA and AMX role should be eliminated and replaced with the SE position to streamline the sales process and improve employee engagement/retention. The company needs to spend more dollars in training and then give people full reigns to make things happen. This is a company for someone who graduated confused and who doesn't know what they want to do, but needs to get professional skills while exploring. This is not a company for an individual with a well-defined interest and ambitious goals in that specific industry. Park your car here for 1.5-2 years, learn how to operate in an office environment at a higher profile setting, and figure out what you want to do with the rest of your life, then leave (unless you are in senior management and have the opportunity to manage a chunk of the business and set the strategic direction). Like virtually all workplaces, your experience here will immensely impacted by the quality of your manager (and the quality of managers at CEB by and large is low), so it's a gamble. Most importantly, know this: if you are entrepreneurial, top down processes, and hierarchy, you'll need to readjust your expectations appropriately. You will only do exactly what the job description shows when applying and work in a silo'd capacity. Nothing less, nothing more. I wrote this review not to dissuade you from working here, but to give you a full reality view to enable you to make an educated decision. I tried to offer both positive and negative comments to balance this review out.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Hold higher recruiting standards for managers (and preferably hire managers over the age of 30--even if you need to compensate them more). Give entry-level employees more ownership and a broader portfolio of responsibilities. Streamline sales roles and eliminate business dev/account management associate roles that serve neither the company nor the employees. Give people opportunities to take "smart risk" and try out initiatives they come up with. Foster an entrepreneurial culture and rely less on top-down processes. Make corporate performance the focus of the firm, not the 5 year growth goal.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO