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Helpful (4)

A mistake for MBAs looking for M&A or Strategy projects

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - Advisory Senior Associate in Chicago, IL (US)
Former Employee - Advisory Senior Associate in Chicago, IL (US)

I worked at PwC full-time (More than a year)

Doesn't Recommend
Negative Outlook
No opinion of CEO
Doesn't Recommend
Negative Outlook
No opinion of CEO

Pros

Good brand name - I got calls from recruiters within a week of joining the firm
Numerous offices
Ability to see strategy projects carried through to implementation
Decent health plan

Cons

Lack of support for MBA new hires and Experienced Hires. PwC offers minimal training once you're more than a year past college. New Managers hired from industry aren't trained to manage clients, projects, staff, in the context of Management Consulting.

Low compensation compared to other Consulting jobs. PwC lags the market on salary. Performance bonuses for each performance rating are about half what you might expect from a Consulting firm. Retirement plan is minimal and has a 5 year vesting schedule, so the vast majority of staff can expect to never collect on the employer contributions. The health plan is decent but the employee contribution is pretty high for a professional services firm.

PwC's client relationships aren't as strong as they should be, so strategy projects are often sold on price, rather than value. Strategy projects are routinely underpriced, cutting rates and staff hours allocated without reducing the scope of work promised to the client. For staff, that means that you're working double hours and not getting rewarded for it.

Expectations around utilization and how many hours you can bill per day don't account for the substantial differences between M&A type projects (very long hours, high pressure, short duration, unpredictable nature of when these projects come up), Strategy projects (long hours, 2-3 months duration, somewhat unpredictable demand), and long-term implementation type projects (more reasonable hours, duration of 12+ months, highly predictable demand). Overall, the expectations set for staff are based on the long-term implementation projects, so you'll have to make a tough choice between doing strategic projects that offer growth and learning opportunities, and staff-augmentation projects that hit your utilization numbers to keep you employed.

PwC has some interesting projects, but you'll sacrifice your utilization metrics, because the strategic projects aren't as well defined. Directors won't communicate a clear end date for your current project, making it difficult to get seamless staffing onto the next project if you're not 100% sure when you'll come available. Some Partners will try to hold on to a particular staff member even when start dates are delayed due to client reasons -- but staff is accountable for utilization and during those days or weeks on hold, your utilization will drop off rapidly. Because despite PwC's focus on ethical practices, more often than not you will be pressured to under-report your hours by as much as 50%. If you don't comply, you'll be penalized in your reviews, and if you do comply, you'll still be penalized because your performance (billable hours) is less than that of your peers.

Your mileage may vary -- the organizational culture within Advisory is highly inconsistent. I've worked for some excellent Partners and Directors who really support their people, and I've also worked for some Directors who lack the ability to communicate effectively and treat staff as disposable commodities. If you can find a great Partner or Director to work with, stick with that person as long as possible.

Advice to Management

If you expect to recruit and retain top talent, make upward feedback a larger component of the annual performance review process for Partners and Directors. These folks have wildly inconsistent expectations of staff at any given level. The good ones realize they can't push staff to the point of exhaustion and burnout, but quite a few haven't made this connection yet.

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  1. Helpful (1)

    Bureaucratic audit factory where people too nice and too smart slave away for the sake of a qualification...

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Audit Associate in London, England (UK)
    Current Employee - Audit Associate in London, England (UK)

    I have been working at PwC full-time (More than a year)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    Reputation. No arguments on them being a level above the other big 4s.

    Sexy list of big name clients.

    Robust training. You learn a lot indeed, in the classroom and the audit room.

    Job security once you are qualified as accountants are constantly in demand for mid to high level financial controller, management accounts or management role.

    Cons

    No room for faltering or slow learners. Must deliver constantly.

    No say on which clients you will get on. Resourcing basically puts you on whoever they feel like when you join the firm and its very likely you will not be able to get off them all three freaking years.

    Ridiculous pay structure. Some will be working easy hours as RAS associates, whilst the poor sods who've managed to get themselves on Group audits will be working away until 2 am for weeks fighting the constant urge to reach for the razor and painkillers in their bottom drawer. None of this makes a difference as you are not paid for overtime and the pay is standardised per level. Some half decent managers will offer days off in lieu of overtime but whats a few extra holidays when you are skint as a potato sack.

    The most boring, dry, petty, repetitive kind of work. May I add it will probably only get worse once you enter industry (which you most likely will as one has a higher chance of passing out a bladder stone without surgery and finding it to be a diamond than securing a manager role within PwC). So a perfect place for some business school grad with no creative talents who is wetting his pants in the face of the global downturn. But for others who are using it as a stop over to set up a fall back net, it will do.

  2. Great learning job and great experience acquired

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Senior Tax Consultant in Curitiba (Brazil)
    Current Employee - Senior Tax Consultant in Curitiba (Brazil)

    I have been working at PwC full-time (More than 5 years)

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Learning enviroment, great ethical people, top minded company when auditing and tax consulting are minded.

    Cons

    Low payment for a great responsability, Slow growing career if you make great results. Bonuses are not a reality at this company if you do great job.

    Advice to Management

    Find better ways to keep a work/life balance.

There are newer employer reviews for PwC
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