Compare PepsiCo vs Britannia Industries Limited BETA

See how working at PepsiCo vs. Britannia Industries Limited compares on a variety of workplace factors. By comparing employers on employee ratings, salaries, reviews, pros/cons, job openings and more, you'll feel one step ahead of the rest. All salaries and reviews are posted by employees working at PepsiCo vs. Britannia Industries Limited. Learn more about each company and apply to jobs near you.
PepsiCo company icon

PepsiCo

Employee Ratings

  • PepsiCo scored higher in 2 areas: Compensation & Benefits and Culture & Values.
  • Britannia Industries Limited scored higher in 5 areas: Overall Rating, Senior Management, CEO Approval, % Recommend to a friend and Positive Business Outlook.
  • Both tied in 2 areas: Career Opportunities and Work-life balance.
Overall Rating
(full-time and part-time employees only)
Overall Rating
(full-time and part-time employees only)
3.9
(based on 13546 reviews)
Overall Rating
(full-time and part-time employees only)
4.0
(based on 256 reviews)
Career Opportunities
Career Opportunities
3.8
Career Opportunities
3.8
Compensation & Benefits
Compensation & Benefits
3.9
PepsiCo employees rated their Compensation & Benefits 0.5 higher than Britannia Industries Limited employees rated theirs.
Compensation & Benefits
3.4
Work-life balance
Work-life balance
3.3
Work-life balance
3.3
Senior Management
Senior Management
3.5
Senior Management
3.7
Culture & Values
Culture & Values
3.8
Culture & Values
3.7
CEO Approval
CEO Approval
PepsiCo Ceo Ramon Laguarta
84%
84%Ramon Laguarta
CEO Approval
Britannia Industries Limited Ceo VARUN BERRY
97%
97%VARUN BERRY
Britannia Industries Limited employees rated their CEO Approval 13% higher than PepsiCo employees rated theirs.
% Recommend to a friend
% Recommend to a friend
77%
% Recommend to a friend
85%
Britannia Industries Limited employees rated their % Recommend to a friend 8% higher than PepsiCo employees rated theirs.
Positive Business Outlook
Positive Business Outlook
71%
Positive Business Outlook
87%
Britannia Industries Limited employees rated their Positive Business Outlook 16% higher than PepsiCo employees rated theirs.

Salaries

PepsiCo has 374 more total submitted salaries than Britannia Industries Limited.
Salaries for similar jobs
Salaries for similar jobs
Deputy Manager26 Salaries
₹9,52,028/yr
Associate Manager23 Salaries
₹13,00,000/yr
Sales Manager5 Salaries
₹33,52,121/yr
Salaries for similar jobs
AREA SALES MANAGER9 Salaries
₹17,25,306/yr
TSI7 Salaries
₹6,05,584/yr
Area Sales Executive13 Salaries
₹6,31,179/yr

What Employees Say

  • "Good pay" was the most mentioned Pro at PepsiCo.
  • "Britannia" was the most mentioned Pro at Britannia Industries Limited.
  • "Long hours" was the most mentioned Con at PepsiCo.
  • "Work life balance" was the most mentioned Con at Britannia Industries Limited.
Pros
Pros
"Good pay"(in 809 reviews)
"Good benefits"(in 482 reviews)
Pros
"Britannia"(in 19 reviews)
"Work culture"(in 18 reviews)
Cons
Cons
"Long hours"(in 890 reviews)
"No work life"(in 235 reviews)
Cons
"Work life balance"(in 24 reviews)
"Britannia"(in 11 reviews)
Featured Review

Current Employee - Senior Area Sales In Charge

I have been working at PepsiCo full-time for more than 10 years

Pros

Area Sales IN charge with total 23 years + of work experience in FMCG sales. Recognized for Record - Setting sales figures, Territory expansion and new account development in PepsiCo. Proven... ability to lead sales teams to achieve revenue and share as per the plan. Offer an in-depth understanding of the sales process while remain focused on customer satisfaction throughout all stages. Experienced, fearless, expert planner, negotiator and deal closure professional.

Cons

Effectively managing the assigned territory in order to achieve sales targets Managing, motivating, and supervising sales persons and distributors Planning and implementing cost effective trade... marketing strategies and distribution models to qualitatively and efficiently service the markets and outlets Gathering market intelligence and keeping abreast with product, brand and consumer trends Working towards increasing profitability through incremental business Ensuring the distributors and Spokes put in adequate fixed and variable working capital Design, plan and implement local level consumer and trade promotions Identifying and appointing new distributors & spokes to increase market reach and presence

Advice to Management

One of the best ways to become a better writer or storyteller is to consume stories. Read them, watch them, listen to them. It's just a fact. 1. Start delegating. You’re no longer just a doer,... checking tasks off a to-do list. You’re now a leader and a coach, who needs to focus on helping others succeed. And that requires delegating responsibilities. It’s easy to fall into the habit of saying, “I’ll just do it myself”—especially when faced with an assignment you’ve completed multiple times or a system only you know how to use. But you need to fight the urge to tackle tasks alone. The more time you spend upfront teaching direct reports how to solve a particular problem, the less time you waste when the assignment resurfaces later on. By delegating, you prove to your employees that you trust them to get the job done and value their input—and that has a positive impact on morale. Gallup research shows that managers are primarily responsible for their employees’ engagement levels. You need to provide employees with professional development opportunities and the chance to learn new skills. Remember: If your team fails, so do you. 2. Learn how to address difficult situations. Given that employees in the United States spend 2.8 hours per week on workplace conflict, it’s inevitable that you’ll find yourself in some tense conversations. When you do, your instinct might be to ignore them in hopes that the situation will eventually resolve itself. Perhaps confrontation makes you uncomfortable or you don’t want to hurt a subordinate’s feelings. The more you avoid an issue, though, the worse it becomes, which is why you need to learn how to effectively resolve workplace conflict. If members of your team approach you with a problem, actively listen to what they’re saying and practice empathy. It’s important that you acknowledge your employees’ feelings and understand their perspective so that you can get to the root of the issue and collaboratively work toward a proper solution. 3. Acknowledge changed relationships. Workplace conflict often occurs when your relationships start to change. If you were promoted from within, it’s possible that the person you routinely gossiped with is now a direct report, or that you’re managing employees who were once your peers. Finding a balance between friend and manager is hard—but important. Some information is too confidential to share, and you can’t let personal relationships color your judgment. That’s why it’s best to proactively address any changes. It could be as simple as saying, “I value our friendship but, as a manager, I need the team to trust me and see me as fair and consistent.” While it won’t be an easy conversation, it is a necessary one. 4. Focus on building trust. Research shows that when employees feel trusted by their managers, they exert extra effort at work and are happier in their roles. So it’s important to prioritize building trust. Schedule one-on-one meetings with each of your direct reports. During those meetings, ask what their professional goals are and how you can help them take the next step in their career. If they want to learn a particular skill, is there a project you can assign them or training you can recommend? If you invest in their future, it’s likely they’ll feel more invested in the company. Transparency can also help build trust. When decisions are made, speak openly about the implications and results of those decisions, whether positive or negative, with the team. Share important information, as well as what you’re working on, and encourage others to do the same. That open and honest communication will foster trust amongst the team. 5. Offer timely feedback. According to a survey conducted by PwC, nearly 60 percent of respondents would like feedback on a daily or weekly basis. If there’s an employee that needs feedback, make sure it’s timely; don’t just wait for the annual review. Subordinates can’t apply advice if the project has passed, and you might cause additional roadblocks if you don’t address the situation right away. By offering timely feedback, you’re giving employees the chance to improve their performance and grow professionally, which, in turn, will build trust. 6. Ask for feedback. Just as you expect employees on your team to continuously learn from the feedback you give them, it’s important that you also make an effort to assess your own strengths and weaknesses to help yourself grow over time. Don’t be afraid to ask your employees for constructive feedback so that you can identify areas where you may need to improve. Not only will this help you set goals for yourself, but it will also show your employees that you value their input and you have the interests of the team as a whole at heart. 7. Find a mentor. The problems you’re facing likely aren’t new. Someone in your company or industry has already dealt with an employee who’s underperforming or has been forced to tell someone who’s over-performing the benefits he or she wants aren’t guaranteed. That’s why it’s important to find mentors you can turn to for advice or support when issues arise. By learning from their mistakes, you can avoid making missteps yourself. 8. Don’t let yourself get discouraged. If issues do arise, don’t get discouraged. You’re a new manager; you’re not expected to know everything. Ask for help when needed, own up to mistakes, and graciously accept any feedback. It’s easy to feel overwhelmed in a new role. But when you do, remind yourself that you were promoted for a reason. 9. Hone your leadership skills. Although the terms “leadership” and “management” or often used interchangeably, they are, in fact, distinct skill sets. It’s likely that you’ve been promoted to your new role based on the managerial skills that you demonstrate, such as problem-solving, organization, and delegation. Now that you’ve earned the title of “manager,” it’s also time to hone your leadership skills. Leaders often demonstrate key characteristics including a high degree of emotional intelligence, excellent interpersonal skills, and resilience, which allow them to better understand the needs of their teammates and empower them to work toward a common goal. While not all leaders hold managerial positions, strong leadership skills are what make great managers.

Current Employee - Area Sales Executive

I have been working at Britannia Industries Limited full-time for less than a year

Pros

Very good company in terms of culture and hear you learn a lot about proper distribution

Cons

Nothing if you want to learn distribution then you join

Job Postings

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