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C.H. Robinson

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C.H. Robinson

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C.H. Robinson Diversity And Inclusion FAQ

Read what C.H. Robinson employees think about diversity and inclusion at the company, and if their workforce is comprised and supportive of individuals of varying gender, ethnicity, age, sexual orientation, religion and other attributes.

C.H. Robinson has a diversity rating of 3.9.

All answers shown come directly from C.H. Robinson Reviews and are not edited or altered.

Does there seem to be diversity at C.H. Robinson?

22 English reviews out of 22

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1 September 2020

Pros

Maternity leave, great PTO, great people, continuous learning/improvement, 401(k) matching, employee stock plan, advancement opportunity, charity giving, pay, flexible hours, great medical/vision/dental benefits, work/life balance, continuous work on diversity, lots of social groups, employee #Pets channel

Cons

Maternity leave could be longer, no campus gym

Maternity leave, great PTO, great people, continuous learning/improvement, 401(k) matching, employee stock plan, advancement opportunity, charity giving, pay, flexible hours, great medical/vision/dental benefits, work/life balance, continuous work on diversity, lots of social groups, employee #Pets channel

1 September 2020

Reviewed by: Business Analyst in Eden Prairie, MN (Current Employee)

9 February 2022

Pros

So many great things to say about this company! They prioritize diversity and inclusion especially at the upper leadership level. Also, providing opportunity for advancement and growth.

Cons

Too much is often loaded on people who do well and overachievers. Old habits die hard in terms of process and procedural development. Great people managers get so overwhelmed with other “priorities” that often the people who should be their actual priority are left without guidance and leadership. Huge lack of compensation transparency and not really in line with the market.

Advice to Management

Allow people leaders to truly have an opportunity to grow and develop their teams.

They prioritize diversity and inclusion especially at the upper leadership level.

9 February 2022

Reviewed by: Anonymous in Charleston, SC (Current Employee)

30 July 2021

Pros

Great overall network, people, and benefits. Market communication is some if the best in the industry and family health benefits are ideal.

Cons

Promotion, unless you are an original Phoenix International employee or favored as an individual, is near impossible. The company is so large promotion positions are hard to come by, too. Their women-in-leadership program is corporate jargon to promote a handful of women to set the appearance they care about diversity in the workforce. Overall, men still dominate the scene in management, and are often advanced faster than women. The office you work for will make or break your career. While some managers are great, others will bet against your success; even when largely responsible for overseeing your career's success. For sales, their file profitability report is not always accurate and is hard to dispute. You will feel cheated at times. They will pull accounts away last minute, even when at the onboarding stage, and credit to higher titled sales reps if you sell above your swim lane vs promoting you. For sales, a promotion is $10-15k higher annual salary but 100% more required rolling-12 annual NET profit. The NET increase requirements don't balance out the stress to hit numbers that the title or pay offer.

Advice to Management

When you find managers betting against individuals they themselves hirer, weed them out. Truly promote the best person for roles based on performance. When you promote sales, compensate them accordingly (base salaries are lower than industry standard). Stop making news articles about charity donations (X to truck drivers during covid, etc) while laying off hundreds of domestic sales reps or, how you are advancing women in the workforce when you slot a woman in a promoted role less often then men. Don't become so large that the people who run the organization feel replaceable.

leadership program is corporate jargon to promote a handful of women to set the appearance they care about diversity in the workforce.

30 July 2021

Reviewed by: Sales Executive (Former Employee)

12 November 2021

Pros

- IT has freedom to work FT from home which provides a lot of work/life balance - The company is well-founded and is stable from an employers standpoint - Is vesting money in re-imagining logistics by heavy IT involvement, so there's a lot of work to be done

Cons

- Leadership within the IT space is very fragmented, with a lot of turnover in the last 12 months - Ignorant sexism has occurred within leadership, with subordinates and peers alike, with minimal consequence - The culture is not what it once was, as it feels like it's driven by men - the diversity of the IT space is vastly better than what is seen in leadership

Advice to Management

- Diversify leadership, and empower diversity at the employee level - Remove intolerant or blatantly sexist management - Openly talk about this with the entire IT staff, hiding it under the rug and ignoring it is way worse than being open and transparent - Be more transparent in general, there's a very cloak and dagger feel which is also causing turnover.

the diversity of the IT space is vastly better than what is seen in leadership

12 November 2021

Reviewed by: Software Engineer II (Former Employee)

29 March 2021

Pros

C.H.R. is modern, friendly, and a decent company to work for. You get great benefits and fantastic resources. The people you can meet and connect with are fanominal.

Cons

Depending on what team you work on in the company will greatly determine your level of satisfaction. I currently work on a delivery team and I am not very satisfied with my day to day. I would rather spend my time coding and learning more about code than the countless meetings, inner sourcing, and the constant waiting for approvals that I do. I don't own my code base. When I first got here they had UX department and so many positions in place like agile coaches to help move projects along. But, I've worked for this company for 4 years and we've had a company reorganization at least twice a year since then. We've gotten a new CTO, and the company seems to restructure like it's playing musical chairs. They act like they are agile development, but they've slowly phased out the agile coach positions and they almost force the delivery teams to work waterfall. It's very stressful and people keep leaving because of it. So the ones left are left to pick up the slack and instead of getting actual help or relieving the burden they just reshuffle so you never know who your new boss is or what the new expectations are until you get scolded on it. Because they did tell you, but it was an email from three months ago and you didn't have to work in that area then but you do now. I've also been a part of their Employee resource programs, and tried to engage in IT discussions on how better to improve things. They organized a committee to help and when the committee gave them their ideas they just kind of let it fall on deaf ears. They are trying in ways. Trying to stay current on tech, trying to focus on their people and what they want. However if you're not outspoken enough you will not be heard. Honestly even with their diversity and inclusion programs you still will have cognative bias. I've been engaged in so many groups and programs and still not promoted, I constantly see my male counterparts get elevated instead of me when I've done just as much as they have. I had spoken to one of my managers about how I thought I wanted to be groomed for management only to find out when he left he told no one else about it and had basically set it up so he wouldn't lose me on his team because I'm such a hard worker. They tell you you're family, and that they need you. So you pick up the slack and then end up working nights and weekends to make deadlines because you had to wait months for approvals to even code. But the clock started so make those numbers!! Anyway, the experience made me realize I am not cut out for the beaurocracy of Management. I honestly only thought it would be a good fit because I saw a need for competant leadership and no one else was speaking up. So I took a shot because I cared. I don't care anymore, I'll just take my paycheck and go.

Advice to Management

Abolish Nast, or use the delivery teams to help uplift all your code bases to the cloud. You've got a bunch of smart capable people in the weeds who are just shy and waiting for direction. You train them but then they don't even get to use what they were trained in. Use what you have!! Also make COMPANY wide standards not just teams and areas. Having the delivery teams have to juggle the standards and code of every other team and department is insane. People can't keep that much straight and mistakes just keep happening. Stop ignoring the efficiency methods you yourself put in place. You also really need more dedicated and standard onboarding. With so much shuffling and restructuring no one ever knows what's going on or what's is expected of them in their day to day. Also stop letting random person who wants to make random technology make the new app for whatever then use that to leverage themselves a bigger better job with a new company. Because then they leave an undocumented code base behind that isn't understood for the next rookie to just fix. They can make the app or whatever, but give them a team and resources to document and fully push it to production. Don't just say great, have that to me by Monday and expect your self starter star hear to do everything under the sun and their day job.

Honestly even with their diversity and inclusion programs you still will have cognative bias.

29 March 2021

Reviewed by: Software Engineer II in Kansas City, MO (Current Employee)

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22 English reviews out of 22

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