ClearView Healthcare Partners Benefits FAQ

Read what ClearView Healthcare Partners employees think about benefits at the company.

If you want to see a full list of benefits and perks at ClearView Healthcare Partners listed by categories, head to their Benefits page. From insurance, health and wellness to vacation and more, find out what you could benefit from when working at ClearView Healthcare Partners.

All answers shown come directly from ClearView Healthcare Partners Reviews and are not edited or altered.

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3 English questions out of 3

2 September 2020

What is health insurance like at ClearView Healthcare Partners?

Pros

Amazing talented people You will learn a lot about the healthcare industry

Cons

Partners are only concerned about money. They don’t even show up at training week. There is a big suck up culture in the Boston office. Partners take a huge cut while underpaying and overworking there employees — shameful - People at the analyst to consultant level are are paid half of what their time is worth - You will be working until 1am - Toxic culture of no personal life - White/Asian male nerds run this place with the mentality of not having any personal life - all the negative reviews are true and clearview is faking reviews! Glassdoor needs to moderate this because the true side of ClearView is showing - PAY US MORE AND GIVE US SOME TIME TO BREATHE - employee morale is going down rapidly, there is a lack of managers, and a huge gap between partner expectations and analysts - much much worse than any other prestigious consulting firm you will ever have the option to work at, so don’t be fooled by all the crap they tell you

Advice to Management

Shame on management for not addressing the employee morale. You can always hire more people, but if you can’t retain and train good managers/staff — good luck succeeding in the long run. Shameful to see so many brilliant employees (from analyst to managers) leave the firm because they are not treated like humans

You will learn a lot about the healthcare industry

2 September 2020

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9 December 2020

Does ClearView Healthcare Partners offer parental leave?

Pros

ClearView is a great place to work if you want to accelerate your career and if you’re willing to work hard. Since it’s consulting, the job isn’t perfect, but there are a lot of pros along with the cons. Great people and culture – As all the other reviews say, ClearViewers are great. Almost every single person I worked with in my 3+ years at the firm was smart, motivated, and committed to putting together a great output on each project. Most ClearViewers are great socially as well. I honestly had a great time at company events or even just chit-chatting in the office (pre-COVID), and I made an amazing group of friends at ClearView. Opportunities for advancement – ClearView truly is a meritocracy, and strong performers can get promoted really quickly. To put it bluntly, there are very few places where there's abundant opportunity to make a six-figure salary within a year or two of finishing your undergrad in biology. Yes, advancing quickly requires hard work, but it’s doable for those who want it. Compensation and benefits – The compensation package is pretty strong, especially once you’re a couple years in at the firm. Obviously the salary doesn’t match MBB, but this is a small company with a different business model (no travel, no up or out policy, etc.). The benefits are decent (e.g., good health insurance, moderate 401k match, bonus was essentially guaranteed), and the company provides a lot of perks like free dinners, fun events, etc. The parental leave policy is fairly generous, and there’s flexibility if you ever face a personal or family emergency. Business outlook and job security – The firm is doing great, even now in the midst of COVID, and the business has consistently grown year-over-year. Even after leaving, I have a lot of faith in the company as a whole, the leadership, and ClearView's work. And couple "neutral" things: Manipulated reviews – I’m shocked by some of the claims on here that the positive reviews are fake. I can say with 100% honestly that, in my 3+ years at ClearView, I was never asked to leave a review, let alone a dishonest review. Leadership reaction to feedback – I think ClearView’s leadership actually makes a good faith effort to implement feedback from the staff, but it’s just a very slow process. For example, a year or two ago, people were stressed about not having a break between projects, so the company instituted a policy where As/Cs get at least one day off between each project. People complained about lingering work, so now projects are extended much more frequently and more easily. People complained about salaries, so we had a company-wide salary adjustment in late 2019. People wanted a greater commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion, so the firm developed an action plan that spans recruiting, professional development, retention, etc. The organization definitely isn’t perfect here and the large-scale changes are somewhat slow, but there is definitely a commitment to improvement.

Cons

Hours can be long – At all levels, you will semi-regularly work late nights. Even on a “normal” project, there are some late nights throughout the project, and then there are “bad” projects where you end up burning (usually due to poor scoping or especially demanding clients). I’m not going to lie, high-burn projects can really suck. That said, it’s temporary; all projects end. Of note, weekend work was pretty rare in my experience. Need for a quick ramp – The first 6 – 12 months in consulting are hard for everyone. It takes some time to learn how to do this job, and there’s really no getting around that. If you’re thinking about starting a job in consulting, you should EXPECT a steep learning curve before you become competent at your job. For most people, once you’ve been here for 9 – 12 months, things get a lot easier and work-life balance gets better. A small subset of people can’t hack it and never reach the point where it gets easier, but those folks tend to move on to other jobs (which may explain some of the complaints in other reviews). Client service can be annoying – In my experience, >90% of clients are totally reasonable, but there are some clients who are exceptionally awful to work with. Sometimes I wish that ClearView leadership would be a little more selective – i.e., if someone is a truly terrible client, stop selling projects to them.

Advice to Management

Be more selective about which clients you work with Scope projects more generously to allow for sustainable hours Focus on retention to enable growth (rather than hiring huge incoming classes)

The parental leave policy is fairly generous, and there’s flexibility if you ever face a personal or family emergency.

9 December 2020

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15 September 2020

Does ClearView Healthcare Partners offer a wellness program?

Pros

- Client-first mentality leads to, on average, high quality work that is industry leading - Really great training ground if you find the right person to take you under their wing

Cons

- Poor leadership creates a pressure cooker environment: Any project mistakes get blamed and put onto the analysts or consultants, never the engagement manager / principals / etc. There is very little accountability at the senior levels (or, at least, based on how they handle it publicly.) It is not uncommon for people to cry or absolutely lose it at work. Quite frankly, I know of multiple people who have explored therapy specifically to deal with toxic aspects of this company. (Disclaimer: huge proponent of mental health wellness here - great that people got the help they needed but inexcusable that this company is what drove them to need it in the first place.) - Favoritism / Politics / Extreme Bias: Reviews, promotions, etc. are not very objective. Leadership can claim that it's calibrated via debate and discussion amongst management discussion, but you don't get rid of the bias if the entire leadership is comprised predominantly of white males. Any positive peer feedback by consultants, managers, etc. on the project can swiftly get over-ridden if someone on the leadership team forms a bad opinion of you in the limited interactions they have with you, and vice versa. - Projects are always understaffed, over-scoped: Projects that really should take 4-6 months get squeezed into 2-3 month engagements. Absolutely ridiculous. You are expected to deliver and if you don't, it's your fault for not being efficient. I actually believed this, until I finally left for a different firm and in retrospect can see how clearly that it was an issue of scope. - No accountability or ownership of areas required to grow: Instead of improving based on the feedback, leadership wastes their energy trying to figure out who wrote which negative review in order to undermine the feedback and posts positive reviews instead. Many including myself have been told to go post positive reviews and flag reviews that were potentially "false" or unfair (read: negative).

Advice to Management

Really thought you'd change after hiring in and promoting new leadership, but the toxicity seems to ingrained to rid.

(Disclaimer: huge proponent of mental health wellness here

15 September 2020

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3 English questions out of 3