ClearView Healthcare Partners FAQ

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What kind of career opportunities exist at ClearView Healthcare Partners?

4 English reviews out of 4

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23 December 2019

Pros

A lot of opportunity to grow and develop as a summer analyst

Cons

Very direct feedback culture, a lot of competition / cut-throat nature at bottom levels

A lot of opportunity to grow and develop as a summer analyst

23 December 2019

Reviewed by: Summer Analyst in United States (Former Intern)

9 December 2020

Pros

ClearView is a great place to work if you want to accelerate your career and if you’re willing to work hard. Since it’s consulting, the job isn’t perfect, but there are a lot of pros along with the cons. Great people and culture – As all the other reviews say, ClearViewers are great. Almost every single person I worked with in my 3+ years at the firm was smart, motivated, and committed to putting together a great output on each project. Most ClearViewers are great socially as well. I honestly had a great time at company events or even just chit-chatting in the office (pre-COVID), and I made an amazing group of friends at ClearView. Opportunities for advancement – ClearView truly is a meritocracy, and strong performers can get promoted really quickly. To put it bluntly, there are very few places where there's abundant opportunity to make a six-figure salary within a year or two of finishing your undergrad in biology. Yes, advancing quickly requires hard work, but it’s doable for those who want it. Compensation and benefits – The compensation package is pretty strong, especially once you’re a couple years in at the firm. Obviously the salary doesn’t match MBB, but this is a small company with a different business model (no travel, no up or out policy, etc.). The benefits are decent (e.g., good health insurance, moderate 401k match, bonus was essentially guaranteed), and the company provides a lot of perks like free dinners, fun events, etc. The parental leave policy is fairly generous, and there’s flexibility if you ever face a personal or family emergency. Business outlook and job security – The firm is doing great, even now in the midst of COVID, and the business has consistently grown year-over-year. Even after leaving, I have a lot of faith in the company as a whole, the leadership, and ClearView's work. And couple "neutral" things: Manipulated reviews – I’m shocked by some of the claims on here that the positive reviews are fake. I can say with 100% honestly that, in my 3+ years at ClearView, I was never asked to leave a review, let alone a dishonest review. Leadership reaction to feedback – I think ClearView’s leadership actually makes a good faith effort to implement feedback from the staff, but it’s just a very slow process. For example, a year or two ago, people were stressed about not having a break between projects, so the company instituted a policy where As/Cs get at least one day off between each project. People complained about lingering work, so now projects are extended much more frequently and more easily. People complained about salaries, so we had a company-wide salary adjustment in late 2019. People wanted a greater commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion, so the firm developed an action plan that spans recruiting, professional development, retention, etc. The organization definitely isn’t perfect here and the large-scale changes are somewhat slow, but there is definitely a commitment to improvement.

Cons

Hours can be long – At all levels, you will semi-regularly work late nights. Even on a “normal” project, there are some late nights throughout the project, and then there are “bad” projects where you end up burning (usually due to poor scoping or especially demanding clients). I’m not going to lie, high-burn projects can really suck. That said, it’s temporary; all projects end. Of note, weekend work was pretty rare in my experience. Need for a quick ramp – The first 6 – 12 months in consulting are hard for everyone. It takes some time to learn how to do this job, and there’s really no getting around that. If you’re thinking about starting a job in consulting, you should EXPECT a steep learning curve before you become competent at your job. For most people, once you’ve been here for 9 – 12 months, things get a lot easier and work-life balance gets better. A small subset of people can’t hack it and never reach the point where it gets easier, but those folks tend to move on to other jobs (which may explain some of the complaints in other reviews). Client service can be annoying – In my experience, >90% of clients are totally reasonable, but there are some clients who are exceptionally awful to work with. Sometimes I wish that ClearView leadership would be a little more selective – i.e., if someone is a truly terrible client, stop selling projects to them.

Advice to Management

Be more selective about which clients you work with Scope projects more generously to allow for sustainable hours Focus on retention to enable growth (rather than hiring huge incoming classes)

Opportunities for advancement – ClearView truly is a meritocracy, and strong performers can get promoted really quickly.

9 December 2020

Reviewed by: Project Lead in United States (Former Employee)

23 March 2020

Pros

Great co-workers who are all relatively like-minded in their intellectual curiosity, team-first mentality, ambition, and work-hard-play-hard approach to the job (including both junior team members all the up to company leadership). Early opportunities to drive projects relatively independently and be client-facing early on in one's tenure. Many interesting and high-impact project types across the biopharma industry. Solid benefits package and competitive salaries, and merit-based promotion policy allows those who are great at the job to rise in the ranks pretty rapidly (with no "up or out" policy for those who take on slower trajectories). Lots of other random perks like end-of-case dinners, quarterly celebrations, near-monthly social events paid for / organized by some arm of the company. Great exit opportunities for those interested in leaving, but great opportunities for internal growth for those interested in being career consultants (i.e., ability to become principal at the company within 5 - 7 years).

Cons

It's hard to agree with several of the recent negative reviews - ClearView has its challenges (mostly in the form of tough work life balance and growing pains from a bolus of new staff), but it's hard to see how there are discrimination issues (if anything, ClearView tries very hard to have a culture of inclusion) and I definitely don't agree that tenured people are not working hard enough / leaving it to the junior team members to do all of the work, etc. (trust me, project leads are working long hours too). I think that the rapid growth and big hiring quotas inevitably mean that we bring in people who are less capable and/or willing to excel, who then harvest resentment when they don't do well at the job, and it's sad to see that several of the reviews are (from my perspective) blatantly inaccurate. Some actual cons from my perspective: - The hours can be long and unpredictable, and a large proportion of managers and leadership don't seem to acknowledge that not everyone wants to live a 24/7 on-call lifestyle - Leadership often appears to put clients and revenues first, rather than prioritizing the team experience, minimizing team burn, and tailoring opportunities to professional development - The rapid growth has led to hiring a subset of candidates that are not very strong and end up not being very capable, even after 6 - 12 months into their tenure - Similarly, the training approach for early onboarding is also insufficient to bring new hires up to speed before throwing them into the lion's den and expecting too much out of them, which causes challenges for more tenured team members in the form of having to redo and/or take on extra work - The promotion policy, while mostly fair, inevitably has some politics around it that can lead to a few being "left behind" - The number of vacation days is way too little considering how long the hours can be

Advice to Management

We know growth is important, but figure out a way to make growth sustainable by hiring the right people and sufficiently training them before expecting them to be functional.

- Leadership often appears to put clients and revenues first, rather than prioritizing the team experience, minimizing team burn, and tailoring opportunities to professional development

23 March 2020

Reviewed by: Consultant in Boston, MA (Current Employee)

4 September 2020

Pros

I worked at ClearView for several years and generally loved the experience. I grew a lot as a young professional, generally enjoyed the work, and learned a lot from some incredible people. To be honest, the job isn't really for everyone, and that's ok. Here's what I will say--ClearView is a great place to work if you: - Want to work with extremely intelligent, diligent, and personable colleagues - Want to get up to speed on the biopharmaceutical industry very quickly - Want to specialize in solving problems specific to the biopharmaceutical industry - Want to grow quickly from a professional development standpoint - Are comfortable with receiving constructive feedback on a regular basis to promote your growth - Like the challenge of solving tough problems, sometimes in really tight time frames - Are comfortable with working late nights to get things done - Would prefer to avoid traveling to be at a client site Monday-Thursday, which is possible with the vast majority of projects the firm sells

Cons

While there are cons to working at ClearView, I would not say these are ClearView-specific--they feel much more like challenges that exist across all consultancies. Some of the top ones that come to mind: - Work-life balance can be tough, especially when you're new to consulting (e.g., 1 year or less) - Projects aren't always scoped properly (or scope can evolve quite quickly in the middle of a project), which can make the project experience challenging - You don't always get to see the decision that your clients have made downstream of your projects, which can feel unsatisfying

- Want to grow quickly from a professional development standpoint

4 September 2020

Reviewed by: Engagement Manager in United States (Former Employee)

4 English reviews out of 4