ClearView Healthcare Partners FAQ

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How are senior leaders perceived at ClearView Healthcare Partners?

9 English reviews out of 9

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24 October 2020

Pros

The people have always been the main asset at ClearView. Also, they do genuinely work on some interesting projects.

Cons

The persistent disregard for employee concerns are finally starting to catch up with ClearView. Attrition is through the roof with nearly half the consultant class from last summer having left already. Former employees are also posting about their experiences on Glassdoor, Fishbowl, and Vault and a clear narrative of poor leadership and toxic work conditions is starting to emerge. Apply at your own risk. Better yet, just take your talent to one of the other LS consulting. There are so many places where you can get the same level of career development for better pay and WAYYYY less stress.

Advice to Management

You've made your priorities clear - I think at this point it is time for the market of incoming talent to take over and respond. Good luck with future recruiting - people are finally starting to see through the smoke and mirrors.

Former employees are also posting about their experiences on Glassdoor, Fishbowl, and Vault and a clear narrative of poor leadership and toxic work conditions is starting to emerge.

24 October 2020

Reviewed by: Senior Consultant in Boston, MA (Current Employee)

15 September 2020

Pros

- Client-first mentality leads to, on average, high quality work that is industry leading - Really great training ground if you find the right person to take you under their wing

Cons

- Poor leadership creates a pressure cooker environment: Any project mistakes get blamed and put onto the analysts or consultants, never the engagement manager / principals / etc. There is very little accountability at the senior levels (or, at least, based on how they handle it publicly.) It is not uncommon for people to cry or absolutely lose it at work. Quite frankly, I know of multiple people who have explored therapy specifically to deal with toxic aspects of this company. (Disclaimer: huge proponent of mental health wellness here - great that people got the help they needed but inexcusable that this company is what drove them to need it in the first place.) - Favoritism / Politics / Extreme Bias: Reviews, promotions, etc. are not very objective. Leadership can claim that it's calibrated via debate and discussion amongst management discussion, but you don't get rid of the bias if the entire leadership is comprised predominantly of white males. Any positive peer feedback by consultants, managers, etc. on the project can swiftly get over-ridden if someone on the leadership team forms a bad opinion of you in the limited interactions they have with you, and vice versa. - Projects are always understaffed, over-scoped: Projects that really should take 4-6 months get squeezed into 2-3 month engagements. Absolutely ridiculous. You are expected to deliver and if you don't, it's your fault for not being efficient. I actually believed this, until I finally left for a different firm and in retrospect can see how clearly that it was an issue of scope. - No accountability or ownership of areas required to grow: Instead of improving based on the feedback, leadership wastes their energy trying to figure out who wrote which negative review in order to undermine the feedback and posts positive reviews instead. Many including myself have been told to go post positive reviews and flag reviews that were potentially "false" or unfair (read: negative).

Advice to Management

Really thought you'd change after hiring in and promoting new leadership, but the toxicity seems to ingrained to rid.

Poor leadership creates a pressure cooker environment: Any project mistakes get blamed and put onto the analysts or consultants, never the engagement manager / principals / etc.

15 September 2020

Reviewed by: Consultant in United States (Former Employee)

4 September 2020

Pros

I intentionally put off writing this review for some time after leaving ClearView to distance myself from the experience of working there enough to deliver an objective review. It is telling that even the most critical reviews here highlight the amazing talent that exists in the Associate through Consultant ranks. I won’t re-hash those perspectives other than to confirm the personnel at that level are genuinely top-notch. The breadth of the projects that the different leadership members tend to sell can allow for a nice variety in the day-to-day work, and provide the opportunity to develop experience with different pharma business units. If you don’t have a solid grounding in industry fundamentals the training provides a reasonable base to work from. Project work can provide a good foundation to transition to a number of roles on the client side, if that is of interest. FYI – do not get sucked into thinking you need to stay long enough make it to EM to move to pharma. Pharma isn’t going to hire an EM for anything they wouldn’t hire an experienced Consultant for.

Cons

The frustration with leadership expressed in many of these reviews mirrors my experience as well. Scheduled/approved time off is not respected by managers, literally all 24 hours of every day are expected to be made available to CV, rotating project teams mean no manager feels a responsibility to help you develop, pay is not comparable with other firms doing comparable work, etc. For some, the experience may still be worth it. Understand up front, however, that there will be no room in your life regularly for anything or anyone except CV. The lack of response to issues from leadership, however, is entirely understandable. They don’t own the company. A PE firm does, which they don’t tell you when joining. Leadership is not interested in developing a solid employee base that is well treated in order to drive long-term growth or sustainability of the business. They want to make the business look as expensive as possible on paper so that they and the PE firm can soon exit their minority position at a large premium. When you understand that the primary interest for leadership is putting themselves in a position to retire in 18 months you can see why they aren’t interested in how much sleep you get. Given this reality, don’t expect a sudden awakening of leadership to your needs.

Advice to Management

Some of these fake reviews are comically transparent.

The frustration with leadership expressed in many of these reviews mirrors my experience as well.

4 September 2020

Reviewed by: Consultant in New York, NY (Former Employee)

4 September 2020

Pros

1. Amazing people 2. If you want to be in the life sciences industry, working here would be incredible over McKinsey or other firms because you get real expertise rather than a general toolkit 3. You will learn from the best people who juggle nitty gritty science to big bucks business, and you will be amazed every single day at their genius.

Cons

1. Horrible work hours compared to what they pay in terms of base and bonus 2. Need to normalize "weekends off" and at least 7-8 hours of sleep a night 3. Leadership is great at selling projects, but not at managing people; every organization needs good managers to grow. 4. There is no difference skills wise between an analyst and a senior analyst, and arguably no real difference between SA's and consultants. This company needs to promote faster, or pay a greater base salary to analysts.

Advice to Management

1. Train your managers better. The skillset of a manager is not the skillset of an amazing consultant. Therefore, training the middle management is extremely important. In recent years, many great managers have left due to the WLB issues, creating an awful dynamic of the best consultants having to multitask and manage analysts, get no sleep, burn out, and leave. This is a shame and ClearView needs to fix this if they want to grow sustainably. 2. You need to pay your employees more. Pay your analysts a good rate for the amount of time they work, because otherwise they can just leave u to go work for investment banks and industry! 3. While consulting is generally a high turnover industry and that's okay for big firms, you can't really grow your company to a sustainable degree if people keep leaving. Analysts at the firm become disillusioned very quickly about the work life balance and burn out, reducing the number of ppl who are available to get promoted to consultant. Same thing with consultants -- if your biology PhD grads have to work 16 hours a day to crank numbers, you can bet that they will leave for industry after a year of amazing training. Sucks for you. 4. Leadership needs to get better at scoping of projects with clients. Yes we are a consulting client service firm, but if we take on more than we can chew such that it is internally bleeding us, you can be assured that growth is not worth anything. 5. TAKE CARE OF YOUR EMPLOYEES. They are the best people you can find on the market for translating science into business, so other firms will take care of them if you don't.

3. Leadership is great at selling projects, but not at managing people; every organization needs good managers to grow.

4 September 2020

Reviewed by: Analyst in New York, NY (Current Employee)

20 September 2020

Pros

- The other reviews are correct - the people you work with (at least at the analyst and consultant levels) are really great - almost everyone is incredibly smart and more importantly always approachable and willing to help you when you need it (even while they're swamped on their own projects). Which of course makes the attrition even more painful, since you're seeing tons of good people leave every week/month

Cons

- Morale is way down and attrition is through the roof. people are overworked and WFH has removed what little boundaries remained between work and non-work. A lot of this has due to the company being too successful for its own good - we've been staffed out all summer, and projects are staffed too lean and managers are on 4 - 6 projects at a time, so the burden then falls onto the team to just carry the project and figure out whatever leadership and the client wants. Theoretically a great growth opportunity I guess but it also sets you up for failure if you fail to read their minds. As a result everyone is overstretched and exhausted, and leadership only pays lip service to the problems but won't do anything to actually solve it (e.g., sell fewer projects and scope better) - which just reinforces the problem and makes you even more miserable. - Although the company has expanded at a breakneck pace over the years (we've taken on a ridiculous number of new hires this summer - and of course the burden falls on the existing staff to train them and get them up to speed, on top of all existing project commitments), it's still run like it's a 30 - 50 person firm. Decisions are entirely top-down from leadership, and forget about transparency - we've had too many surveys to count where we don't get to see the results, and action is always promised but nothing ever happens. Also we've done an awful job at integrating senior hires at the manager level and up - there's a very specific culture with the company (I think other reviews are spot-on about drinking the kool-aid), and good luck if you're coming from somewhere else. The one good thing about covid (I guess) is that all the social events can't happen, which means an end to the hard-drinking culture and the alcoholism.

Advice to Management

Cut it out with the fake reviews and maybe do something to actually address the issues that have been brought up ad nauseam on here (and in every exit interview, of which there have been very many recently) Also, I suspect that current leadership thinking is to dismiss all the negative reviews as just being from people who "weren't cut out for the job" and "never a good fit to begin with" but really the sentiment is more widespread than you think - almost everyone I know at the company (including the high-flyers / those who've been promoted multiple cycles in a row) are miserable and unhappy - they just haven't told you yet.

down from leadership, and forget about transparency

20 September 2020

Reviewed by: Consultant in Newton, MA (Current Employee)

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9 English reviews out of 9