Knowledgent FAQ

All answers shown come directly from Knowledgent Reviews and are not edited or altered.

13 English questions out of 13

17 August 2018

What is the retirement plan like at Knowledgent?

Pros

As a first job right out of college, it's not a bad place to start. You learn a good deal more than you would have in college. Of the vast sea of people who like to throw around buzzwords, you'll still find some who actually know what they're talking about. When you get put on a project with a PM who doesn't let people run circles around them, the project ends up turning out pretty great. If you're an engineer or a data scientist, you'll get to list some tools/software that were used on a project on your resume.

Cons

There's a very good scene from Office Space where the protagonist has to explain to the consultant who came in to help the company downsize that he actually has more than one boss. That is a very good representation of what can happen here. When the client gets sold something that has yet to actually be developed, you may find yourself answering to all sorts of people why something isn't running the way it should or why something is missing. Not being able to decide whether we are a consulting company or a software company. We can't be both and it has created a good amount of cognitive dissonance in me when I try to explain to someone what it is that I do. It seems that when trying to do both, we end up having software or extensions of software that has not been properly developed. This is made possible with a combination of having a developer switch roles/projects and project dismissal. No real coding standards or review. As a result of this, in addition to what was mentioned above, some code that should never have made it past an initial sprint gets put into production. If you take pride in your work and are forced to commit coding changes to someone else's bad code, you'll essentially be applying band-aid fixes. The only time that I have done something unique was when it was for an extension to some software--and even then the quality isn't where it should be because of the poor project management that happened at the get go. You will sometimes be tasked with doing something that is quite menial. I have seen engineers give instructions for installing software to clients over Skype/WebEx (this includes telling them to type commands into a Linux terminal window) and heard of Business Analysts get meeting minutes (basically reduced to a lite stenographer for those who are unfamiliar with the term). If you find yourself in a position where you have deliverables coming *and* you have to do the menial tasks outlined above, then you will inevitably find yourself in "crunch time." Adding to that, you may sometimes find yourself obligated to attend meetings that do not really require your presence: you and the team gain nothing by you being there; they do lose some valuable development time, however. The amount that you are compensated, amount of vacation time that you receive, and benefits is sub-par in comparison to the rest of the industry. There's no 401k matching and your vacation time would be considered good if we were in the late 80's.

Advice to Management

When a female employee is harassed, don't try to brush it under the rug. Make a public statement. Hold a company-wide meeting. Do *something*. Not only is the act itself wrong and despicable, but when you don't do anything about it, the morale drops significantly more. If you see that an employee is leaving to work from home because they don't have any pressing tasks, please don't see it as a sign of laziness. It doesn't make any sense to continue being somewhere until rush hour traffic just for the sake of tradition/conformity. PAY your employees what they're worth and LISTEN to their feedback. Have an audit of what pieces of software are worth keeping and which ones should be tossed out. Stop lying to clients & employees and have some proper management. You will save money and have a better reputation for doing so.

There's no 401k matching and your vacation time would be considered good if we were in the late 80's.

17 August 2018

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4 August 2018

How are the career development opportunities at Knowledgent?

Pros

They paid me money which I exchanged for goods and services. Most of the juniors, AKA "fast trackers" are nice and easy to work with. If you're lucky, you'll end up on a project with one of the few honest managers and learn some useful skills to find a better job elsewhere.

Cons

A lot of the positive reviews posted here are fake. It's not hard to spot them. The one talking specifically about working at Knowledgent as a woman was submitted solely because of sexual harassment that an ex-employee publicly disclosed this year. Sales people only care about getting projects started. Once the SOW is signed, good luck getting any support. You will be understaffed with the wrong people and left to fend for yourself. SOWs are often vague - this lets clients abuse your team by constantly changing requirements and rejecting deliverables. The project will run over time and budget and you will be stuck doing work in perpetual "crunch time" until everything is perfect. It's no wonder so few clients ever continue working with Knowledgent. Corners will be cut wherever possible to maximize profits for the people running the company. Juniors are billed as "senior" consultants to clients at 2-3x their actual salary (this is the reason why Knowledgent started hiring so many college students) with little resources to deliver anything other than a rushed mess. Bonuses aren't given and raises are far under industry standard. There are no little to no standards for deliverables, especially for technical employees. The environment is a nightmare for anyone who values quality work. Knowledgent touts the "success" of their fast track program as having a high retention rate, yet most young employees share concerns about job security and inefficient upper management. New hires are often forced onto projects where zero marketable skills are learned. Business Analysts are reduced to exclusively taking "meeting minutes" while Engineers are stuck learning whatever piece of software Sales is currently supposed to sell to clients (right now it's Talend). Not surprisingly, most of the younger talent leaves after picking up the minimum amount of skills required to find a better job. Headhunters for Knowledgent offer potential recruits high salaries to quit their steady jobs and join for a "solid" project. They will keep you on for as long as necessary, then fire you shortly after you hit the bench. It's common to see someone for a few months, then have their name disappear from the email system and never see them again. There is no job security here unless you know someone at the top or take on so much responsibility that you become irreplaceable. The benefits are sub-par for the industry - high copays, not a lot of PTO / vacation and no 401k matching.

Advice to Management

Stop lying to yourselves, your employees and your clients. Build a work environment where people are not afraid to voice their concerns lest they be suddenly fired or suggested to leave. Support your projects and staff each role properly. Stop letting Sales run wild with garbage SOWs. Attempt to create business relationships which last longer than one engagement.

There are no little to no standards for deliverables, especially for technical employees.

4 August 2018

See answer

4 August 2018

What is the feeling of job security at Knowledgent?

Pros

They paid me money which I exchanged for goods and services. Most of the juniors, AKA "fast trackers" are nice and easy to work with. If you're lucky, you'll end up on a project with one of the few honest managers and learn some useful skills to find a better job elsewhere.

Cons

A lot of the positive reviews posted here are fake. It's not hard to spot them. The one talking specifically about working at Knowledgent as a woman was submitted solely because of sexual harassment that an ex-employee publicly disclosed this year. Sales people only care about getting projects started. Once the SOW is signed, good luck getting any support. You will be understaffed with the wrong people and left to fend for yourself. SOWs are often vague - this lets clients abuse your team by constantly changing requirements and rejecting deliverables. The project will run over time and budget and you will be stuck doing work in perpetual "crunch time" until everything is perfect. It's no wonder so few clients ever continue working with Knowledgent. Corners will be cut wherever possible to maximize profits for the people running the company. Juniors are billed as "senior" consultants to clients at 2-3x their actual salary (this is the reason why Knowledgent started hiring so many college students) with little resources to deliver anything other than a rushed mess. Bonuses aren't given and raises are far under industry standard. There are no little to no standards for deliverables, especially for technical employees. The environment is a nightmare for anyone who values quality work. Knowledgent touts the "success" of their fast track program as having a high retention rate, yet most young employees share concerns about job security and inefficient upper management. New hires are often forced onto projects where zero marketable skills are learned. Business Analysts are reduced to exclusively taking "meeting minutes" while Engineers are stuck learning whatever piece of software Sales is currently supposed to sell to clients (right now it's Talend). Not surprisingly, most of the younger talent leaves after picking up the minimum amount of skills required to find a better job. Headhunters for Knowledgent offer potential recruits high salaries to quit their steady jobs and join for a "solid" project. They will keep you on for as long as necessary, then fire you shortly after you hit the bench. It's common to see someone for a few months, then have their name disappear from the email system and never see them again. There is no job security here unless you know someone at the top or take on so much responsibility that you become irreplaceable. The benefits are sub-par for the industry - high copays, not a lot of PTO / vacation and no 401k matching.

Advice to Management

Stop lying to yourselves, your employees and your clients. Build a work environment where people are not afraid to voice their concerns lest they be suddenly fired or suggested to leave. Support your projects and staff each role properly. Stop letting Sales run wild with garbage SOWs. Attempt to create business relationships which last longer than one engagement.

There is no job security here unless you know someone at the top or take on so much responsibility that you become irreplaceable.

4 August 2018

See answer

17 August 2018

How is management perceived at Knowledgent?

Pros

As a first job right out of college, it's not a bad place to start. You learn a good deal more than you would have in college. Of the vast sea of people who like to throw around buzzwords, you'll still find some who actually know what they're talking about. When you get put on a project with a PM who doesn't let people run circles around them, the project ends up turning out pretty great. If you're an engineer or a data scientist, you'll get to list some tools/software that were used on a project on your resume.

Cons

There's a very good scene from Office Space where the protagonist has to explain to the consultant who came in to help the company downsize that he actually has more than one boss. That is a very good representation of what can happen here. When the client gets sold something that has yet to actually be developed, you may find yourself answering to all sorts of people why something isn't running the way it should or why something is missing. Not being able to decide whether we are a consulting company or a software company. We can't be both and it has created a good amount of cognitive dissonance in me when I try to explain to someone what it is that I do. It seems that when trying to do both, we end up having software or extensions of software that has not been properly developed. This is made possible with a combination of having a developer switch roles/projects and project dismissal. No real coding standards or review. As a result of this, in addition to what was mentioned above, some code that should never have made it past an initial sprint gets put into production. If you take pride in your work and are forced to commit coding changes to someone else's bad code, you'll essentially be applying band-aid fixes. The only time that I have done something unique was when it was for an extension to some software--and even then the quality isn't where it should be because of the poor project management that happened at the get go. You will sometimes be tasked with doing something that is quite menial. I have seen engineers give instructions for installing software to clients over Skype/WebEx (this includes telling them to type commands into a Linux terminal window) and heard of Business Analysts get meeting minutes (basically reduced to a lite stenographer for those who are unfamiliar with the term). If you find yourself in a position where you have deliverables coming *and* you have to do the menial tasks outlined above, then you will inevitably find yourself in "crunch time." Adding to that, you may sometimes find yourself obligated to attend meetings that do not really require your presence: you and the team gain nothing by you being there; they do lose some valuable development time, however. The amount that you are compensated, amount of vacation time that you receive, and benefits is sub-par in comparison to the rest of the industry. There's no 401k matching and your vacation time would be considered good if we were in the late 80's.

Advice to Management

When a female employee is harassed, don't try to brush it under the rug. Make a public statement. Hold a company-wide meeting. Do *something*. Not only is the act itself wrong and despicable, but when you don't do anything about it, the morale drops significantly more. If you see that an employee is leaving to work from home because they don't have any pressing tasks, please don't see it as a sign of laziness. It doesn't make any sense to continue being somewhere until rush hour traffic just for the sake of tradition/conformity. PAY your employees what they're worth and LISTEN to their feedback. Have an audit of what pieces of software are worth keeping and which ones should be tossed out. Stop lying to clients & employees and have some proper management. You will save money and have a better reputation for doing so.

The only time that I have done something unique was when it was for an extension to some software--and even then the quality isn't where it should be because of the poor project management that happened at the get go.

17 August 2018

See 1 more answer

27 July 2020

Are employees at Knowledgent generally happy and/or satisfied?

Pros

The people are genuinely pretty awesome. They love to have a great time and make the office a fun place to do work.

Cons

- The focus of people's work is less on quality and more on making a big show to advance in the company. - Poor quality of code from what I've seen in a few different projects. - Teams will stick to non-optimal solutions to stay in their comfort zones.

The people are genuinely pretty awesome.

27 July 2020

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13 English questions out of 13