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State of Connecticut Judicial Branch

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State of Connecticut Judicial Branch

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State of Connecticut Judicial Branch FAQ

Have questions about working at State of Connecticut Judicial Branch? Read answers to frequently asked questions to help you make a choice before applying to a job or accepting a job offer.

Whether it's about compensation and benefits, culture and diversity, or you're curious to know more about the work environment, find out from employees what it's like to work at State of Connecticut Judicial Branch.

All answers shown come directly from State of Connecticut Judicial Branch Reviews and are not edited or altered.

21 English questions out of 21

12 January 2021

What is health insurance like at State of Connecticut Judicial Branch?

Pros

* You get experience / training on a wide variety of cases, depending on which district you are in; everything from criminal, civil, family, probate and housing cases. You learn what happens on the Court's side, which definitely makes your resume look very attractive to employers in private practice. * The health care benefits are very good and the amount that you pay for them each month is very reasonable. * As a state employee, you get the opportunity to do your banking at the state employee's credit union, which is one of the best credit unions in the state. You can also remain with the state employee's credit union if you leave the state's employ. * Generally, your working environment is very supportive, friendly and safe. *The courthouses are very secure buildings and the Judicial Marshals are all well trained on safety guidelines. * You can always leave whatever work that doesn't get finished one day for another day.

Cons

* If you don't have your JD, then your opportunities for advancement / promotion can be impacted. * Unlike in private practice, where you might be guaranteed a raise each year, when working on the judicial side, you will only get a raise if the state government approves it. * As a contracted employee, you are not entitled to a pension, no matter how long you work for the state. * No potential for overtime / hazard pay. * No paid holidays.

The health care benefits are very good and the amount that you pay for them each month is very reasonable.

12 January 2021

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19 March 2021

Does State of Connecticut Judicial Branch offer sponsored degrees?

Pros

The hours are great and so is the experience

Cons

The pay is not good, especially in light of how much law school debt most graduates have.

The pay is not good, especially in light of how much law school debt most graduates have.

19 March 2021

See answer

12 January 2021

Does State of Connecticut Judicial Branch offer an employee assistance or workplace counselling program?

Pros

* You get experience / training on a wide variety of cases, depending on which district you are in; everything from criminal, civil, family, probate and housing cases. You learn what happens on the Court's side, which definitely makes your resume look very attractive to employers in private practice. * The health care benefits are very good and the amount that you pay for them each month is very reasonable. * As a state employee, you get the opportunity to do your banking at the state employee's credit union, which is one of the best credit unions in the state. You can also remain with the state employee's credit union if you leave the state's employ. * Generally, your working environment is very supportive, friendly and safe. *The courthouses are very secure buildings and the Judicial Marshals are all well trained on safety guidelines. * You can always leave whatever work that doesn't get finished one day for another day.

Cons

* If you don't have your JD, then your opportunities for advancement / promotion can be impacted. * Unlike in private practice, where you might be guaranteed a raise each year, when working on the judicial side, you will only get a raise if the state government approves it. * As a contracted employee, you are not entitled to a pension, no matter how long you work for the state. * No potential for overtime / hazard pay. * No paid holidays.

The health care benefits are very good and the amount that you pay for them each month is very reasonable.

12 January 2021

See answer

21 July 2020

Does State of Connecticut Judicial Branch offer unlimited holiday?

Pros

Insurance, pension benefits and time off

Cons

Who knows who, gets the job. Hard work doesn’t pay. People doing nothing gets the big salary.

Advice to Management

Hire based on merit not based on nepotism and favoritism. Reward hard work and loyalty.

Insurance, pension benefits and time off

21 July 2020

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12 January 2021

Does State of Connecticut Judicial Branch have a pension plan?

Pros

* You get experience / training on a wide variety of cases, depending on which district you are in; everything from criminal, civil, family, probate and housing cases. You learn what happens on the Court's side, which definitely makes your resume look very attractive to employers in private practice. * The health care benefits are very good and the amount that you pay for them each month is very reasonable. * As a state employee, you get the opportunity to do your banking at the state employee's credit union, which is one of the best credit unions in the state. You can also remain with the state employee's credit union if you leave the state's employ. * Generally, your working environment is very supportive, friendly and safe. *The courthouses are very secure buildings and the Judicial Marshals are all well trained on safety guidelines. * You can always leave whatever work that doesn't get finished one day for another day.

Cons

* If you don't have your JD, then your opportunities for advancement / promotion can be impacted. * Unlike in private practice, where you might be guaranteed a raise each year, when working on the judicial side, you will only get a raise if the state government approves it. * As a contracted employee, you are not entitled to a pension, no matter how long you work for the state. * No potential for overtime / hazard pay. * No paid holidays.

As a contracted employee, you are not entitled to a pension, no matter how long you work for the state.

12 January 2021

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21 English questions out of 21