Valtech FAQ

All answers shown come directly from Valtech Reviews and are not edited or altered.

23 English questions out of 23

23 May 2019

What is health insurance like at Valtech?

Pros

The culture is good. Atmosphere very nice to work. Well located, interesting projects. Good clients.

Cons

Maybe the flat hierarchy is not the best option. Please improve the health insurance package and the company should pay it entirely.

Please improve the health insurance package and the company should pay it entirely.

23 May 2019

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27 March 2019

How are the career development opportunities at Valtech?

Pros

SMAC Practice is a blend of highly talented people, world changing projects, exciting new technology, supportive team, great ideas and brilliant leadership. There are enormous opportunities to learn and advance your career here. I have met some of the most talented people ever during my time in Valtech. The company provides opportunity for both lateral and upward career development. Overall company culture is amazing, they offer superior benefits, work life balance and they drop you off back home if you worked till late. Fair and square. Senior leadership welcomes creativity, empowers each team to take collaborative decisions, inspires every individual and demonstrate leading by example. Valtech is a place to be and SMAC Practice is a team to work with.

Cons

It’s hard to write cons because I genuinely enjoyed the company. May be we can add a few more beers here :)

Advice to Management

Great work!! Keep it up.

The company provides opportunity for both lateral and upward career development.

27 March 2019

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25 June 2019

What kind of career opportunities exist at Valtech?

Pros

Great work culture, amazing benefits. Work life balance is feasible. I have a really good team in all project which help me to improve my technical skills. Valtech has provided me with numerous opportunities to grow and develop my skills in my field.

Cons

There are no cons, if you a abide with rules and policies

Valtech has provided me with numerous opportunities to grow and develop my skills in my field.

25 June 2019

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26 July 2020

Does Valtech have any sort of mentoring programme?

Pros

• Take accessibility very seriously • Great office location • Really nicely designed offices • Free breakfast and well-stocked drinks fridge, including beers • Some decent clients that might look good on your cv

Cons

Note: This is a review of Valtech in the UK. Valtech in other countries are less focussed on Sitecore development and more on product design. So if you see decent work on their site, chances are it wasn't created in the UK. -------- *General* More inclined towards intellectual back-patting than actually doing things for clients. Someone won an internal award for augmenting something into a post-it note as a personal experiment once. There's been nothing before or since. Says it all. Lots of talk about machine learning and AI, but zero follow-up. Most work is dry government sites, or fixing Sitecore issues other agencies messed up. But zero to shout about as final products. Valtech fundamentally don't care about product design, they care about technical delivery, and would rather celebrate a robust Sitecore build than worry if the end product is great. Probably the most vanilla projects I have ever worked on, and hopefully will ever work on. ------- *Personal development* There are no line managers, so no-one with mentoring skills, and a culture where a number of senior people are only concerned with themselves. Everyone’s “manager” is the MD – no PDPs or appraisals. Personal development is up to the individual to go on a course. Annual promotions is an *application* where you fill out a form and present to people you’ve never ever worked with. So make sure they know who you are, or forget it. And because promotion is about tick boxes rather than measured day-to-day proficiency and soft-skills, the senior team has a number of people who have the charm and people skills of a month-old lemon. ------- *General Culture* Culture is almost non-existent and there's almost no energy to the office; it's like working in a library most of the time. Senior team was made up of people who had been there 20 years, their clique is the only place any kind of culture has survived. Honestly got the impression they were oblivious it wasn’t felt by everyone else. Misleading benefits listed in the job description included paid-for family days “last year's was London zoo”. Utter fiction. Presumably London Zoo was the end of it. Yearly trips abroad? Again, complete nonsense. Beware. ------- *Management* Some terrible working practices. Being asked to put time against booked projects, even when making it explicitly clear nothing was done on those days, misleading billable hours. Over-engineering projects, taking weeks to land on the inevitable. Bad communication, lack of direction - messy delivery management with no clear delineation of roles. Insistence from inexperienced creative managers on defining creative direction for jobs that are dependent on seamlessly integrating with existing user flows ie pages that effectively need to look and function in the same way. Desperate to make a difference to projects, so charmlessly involved themselves in entirely unnecessarily ways. Micromanagement on the UXD team was rife; short, border-line rude comments on Slack rather than helpful and considered feedback, particularly directed to more junior team members, instead of seeing the opportunity to teach. Fixed idea of how to approach jobs in one single way regardless of project needs. Generally very unhappy UXD team in the London office (funnily enough, most of them have left now, however). –––– That all said, if you're a dev you might like it because that's all they care about.

Advice to Management

Either shift your model towards end-to-end product design and educate yourself on all the processes that come with it, or just focus on Sitecore development where you at least know you have a handle on it. Understand that employing people with the right job title is not enough.

one with mentoring skills, and a culture where a number of senior people are only concerned with themselves.

26 July 2020

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26 July 2020

How are promotions handled at Valtech?

Pros

• Take accessibility very seriously • Great office location • Really nicely designed offices • Free breakfast and well-stocked drinks fridge, including beers • Some decent clients that might look good on your cv

Cons

Note: This is a review of Valtech in the UK. Valtech in other countries are less focussed on Sitecore development and more on product design. So if you see decent work on their site, chances are it wasn't created in the UK. -------- *General* More inclined towards intellectual back-patting than actually doing things for clients. Someone won an internal award for augmenting something into a post-it note as a personal experiment once. There's been nothing before or since. Says it all. Lots of talk about machine learning and AI, but zero follow-up. Most work is dry government sites, or fixing Sitecore issues other agencies messed up. But zero to shout about as final products. Valtech fundamentally don't care about product design, they care about technical delivery, and would rather celebrate a robust Sitecore build than worry if the end product is great. Probably the most vanilla projects I have ever worked on, and hopefully will ever work on. ------- *Personal development* There are no line managers, so no-one with mentoring skills, and a culture where a number of senior people are only concerned with themselves. Everyone’s “manager” is the MD – no PDPs or appraisals. Personal development is up to the individual to go on a course. Annual promotions is an *application* where you fill out a form and present to people you’ve never ever worked with. So make sure they know who you are, or forget it. And because promotion is about tick boxes rather than measured day-to-day proficiency and soft-skills, the senior team has a number of people who have the charm and people skills of a month-old lemon. ------- *General Culture* Culture is almost non-existent and there's almost no energy to the office; it's like working in a library most of the time. Senior team was made up of people who had been there 20 years, their clique is the only place any kind of culture has survived. Honestly got the impression they were oblivious it wasn’t felt by everyone else. Misleading benefits listed in the job description included paid-for family days “last year's was London zoo”. Utter fiction. Presumably London Zoo was the end of it. Yearly trips abroad? Again, complete nonsense. Beware. ------- *Management* Some terrible working practices. Being asked to put time against booked projects, even when making it explicitly clear nothing was done on those days, misleading billable hours. Over-engineering projects, taking weeks to land on the inevitable. Bad communication, lack of direction - messy delivery management with no clear delineation of roles. Insistence from inexperienced creative managers on defining creative direction for jobs that are dependent on seamlessly integrating with existing user flows ie pages that effectively need to look and function in the same way. Desperate to make a difference to projects, so charmlessly involved themselves in entirely unnecessarily ways. Micromanagement on the UXD team was rife; short, border-line rude comments on Slack rather than helpful and considered feedback, particularly directed to more junior team members, instead of seeing the opportunity to teach. Fixed idea of how to approach jobs in one single way regardless of project needs. Generally very unhappy UXD team in the London office (funnily enough, most of them have left now, however). –––– That all said, if you're a dev you might like it because that's all they care about.

Advice to Management

Either shift your model towards end-to-end product design and educate yourself on all the processes that come with it, or just focus on Sitecore development where you at least know you have a handle on it. Understand that employing people with the right job title is not enough.

Annual promotions is an

26 July 2020

See answer
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23 English questions out of 23