Verilogue FAQ

All answers shown come directly from Verilogue Reviews and are not edited or altered.

2 English questions out of 2

25 December 2018

What is the company culture like at Verilogue?

Pros

Verilogue is a cool place to transition out of academia/liberal arts into market research. Your experience is really what you make of it and it's largely up to you to develop marketable skills by advocating for yourself. Depending on what department you're in (client service, business development, etc.) the opportunities can vary, but no matter what you'll be exposed to nearly all of the top pharma companies in the world, which can lead to an invaluable network especially if your goal is to go client-side. The work we can do really matters and the studies are usually pretty interesting. It can be a bit of a learning curve especially if you don't have a healthcare or market research background, but you acclimate quickly and can teach yourself most of the technical/medical background. The database itself is super interesting too, and it's a rare opportunity to get exposure to HCP-PT interactions like this. Verilogue has some nice benefits like WFH and a general culture promoting work-life balance. Colleagues were intelligent and nice, although there can be a bit of a "bro" culture among other teams and upper management. The size of the company also allows you access to basically everyone so you can see how colleagues in various stages of their careers got to where they were at.

Cons

When it comes to linguistics, there's a bit of a gap in understanding between those with a linguistics background and those who use it mainly as the selling point. I would call it linguistics "lite" since most of the linguists had theoretical training but what Verilogue does is very applied/borderline anthropology. A lot of my colleagues had graduate degrees ranging from linguistics PhDs to MBAs, but I felt as though that the preference for this type of hiring is largely credentialism. Given the size of the company, there's not much room for advancement as directors and VPs will probably remain in their positions for years. Typically, you might stay for ~2-3 years, hit a ceiling, and leave. Also, since Verilogue is in a very niche area (market research > marketing research > pharma > qualitative > linguistics), it can be difficult to transition out of it, as you may be perceived as overly academic or unable to handle quantitative MR. That said, many who do end up leaving often go to the same companies as other Verilogue alums like W2O. With the work that Verilogue produces, analyses can sometimes seem forced and decks really corny and cluttered with clipart. There's so much potential with the technology and approaches Verilogue has developed, but sometimes this can be limited by high turnover and upper management that is working on...something? Lastly, I think while our culture works for the type of people Verilogue attracts, it'd be nice if there were more camaraderie. I felt as though many teams didn't know each other and that there was disconnect between upper management and the rest of the company, which is surprising since the entire company is basically in one large room.

Advice to Management

Be more transparent about the work you're doing to actively improve Verilogue. Work on increasing retention and developing employees' careers. There's a lot of potential here, but it needs to be developed a lot further; we all know it can!

Verilogue has some nice benefits like WFH and a general culture promoting work-life balance.

25 December 2018

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1 September 2020

What is the work environment like at Verilogue?

Pros

My experience was very positive, fascinating work, a great company. Flexible, supportive work climate with great people

Cons

Would love to see research extended in terms of computational linguistics and research leveraging the corpus. Workload can get difficult to manage during busy times.

Advice to Management

I appreciated the honest and open engagement with our teams. The answers were not always what we wanted, like any company, but executive management was always transparent and genuinely cared about the team so my advice is to maintain the practices that bring people in and allow them to understand why decisions are made.

My experience was very positive, fascinating work, a great company.

1 September 2020

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2 English questions out of 2