Twitter San Francisco Office | Glassdoor.co.in

Twitter San Francisco, CA (US)

4.0
StarStarStarStarStar
Rating TrendsRating Trends

Employees rate San Francisco 1% higher than the overall average

Twitter San Francisco, CA (US) Reviews

  • "Would work here again"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Software Developer in San Francisco, CA (US)
    Current Employee - Software Developer in San Francisco, CA (US)
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Twitter (More than a year)

    Pros

    Good perks at the office

    Cons

    Privacy concerns in the world

    Advice to Management

    Be creative

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Twitter San Francisco, CA (US) Photos

Twitter photo of: Headquarters
Twitter photo of: Afternoon coffee break at our Twitter Cafe
Twitter photo of: Twitter interns or terns as we say.
Twitter photo of: Bring your kid to work day with some of our Twitter parents
Twitter photo of: Patio overlooking Market Street
Twitter photo of: Micro-Kitchen

Twitter San Francisco, CA (US) Jobs

Twitter San Francisco, CA (US) Salaries

Salaries in $ (USD)
Average
Min
Max
$1,27,499 per year
$92k
$175k
$1,27,499 per year
$92k
$175k
$1,59,998 per year
$132k
$185k
$1,33,957 per year
$113k
$160k
$1,33,957 per year
$113k
$160k

Twitter San Francisco, CA (US) Interviews

Experience

Experience
47%
18%
35%

Getting an Interview

Getting an Interview
47%
29%
16%
4
2
1
1

Difficulty

3.1
Average

Difficulty

Hard
Average
Easy
  1.  

    Planner Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA (US)
    No Offer
    Negative Experience

    Application

    I applied through other source. The process took 3+ months. I interviewed at Twitter (San Francisco, CA (US)) in June 2014.

    Interview

    No process but endless interviews. There was the distinct impression of complete disarray and an entire company afflicted by ADD. Constant changes in needs and position titles sufficiently put an end to any clarity at all. Re-orgs are fine, but it assumes there's an 'org' first which is not a strength of the current company or management as far as I could tell.

    Interview Questions

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