Foster Farms "bad behavior" Reviews | Glassdoor.co.in

Foster Farms Employee Reviews about "bad behavior"

Updated Sep 12, 2019

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Found 154 reviews

3.4
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Rating TrendsRating Trends
50%
Recommend to a Friend
84%
Approve of CEO
Foster Farms CEO Dan Huber (no image)
Dan Huber
8 Ratings
Pros
  • "People, family culture, long time well known brand, pay is competitive with good benefits(in 11 reviews)

  • "Treat employees well and a fun family owned work culture(in 9 reviews)

Cons
  • "There is no work/life balance, though this varies between depts(in 4 reviews)

  • "Old-school mentality still lingers, but getting better(in 4 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

Reviews about "bad behavior"

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  1. Helpful (16)

    "Dead end job if you are an MBA or professional manager."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Foster Farms full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Work life balance was off the charts. Overall good people. Family owned means you are not beholden to Wall Street, quarterly targets, etc.

    Cons

    Before you read this, go back about 12-18 months and read those management reviews. Predictions were made that came true: 1. Half of the marketing department is now gone, including a Senior VP, 2 senior managers, a Manager, and several ABMs. Finance, r&d, and QA have also lost leaders. This is because the company doesn't value it's top performers (note to HR: the fact that you moved "our people" to the top of... the values chain but did absolutely nothing to support that is disgraceful). Ron Foster followed the old school philosophy that people should be happy that they have a job and that above and beyond performance should not only be not rewarded or recognized, but actually reviled. If it wasn't him and his small circle of corrupt chief executives coming up with the idea, it wasn't a good one, even if it ended up turning completely failing business units around. 2. Bonus tanked from 150 to the 90s in the span of 6 months, driven by incompetent leadership. Price of grain has apparently rebounded, which may turn that number around. But if you want to join a company whose success is based on luck, you probably aren't reading this. 3. Bad behavior continues to be rewarded. The ever corrupt operations function has seen numerous promotions despite their gross unethical behavior. Case in point: operations costs out products much higher than they actually cost which inhibits marketing and sales ability to price and promote right. Then one of 2 things happens: there is a successful launch and operations claims a large cost favorability at the end of the year, so they look like heroes, or 2) the launch fails, and marketing is nailed to a cross for not succeeding. Either way, operations wins and has undue influence on the rest of the organization, including influence on who in other functions gets promoted (never a positive influence). These are the same folks who don't believe in consumer data, are hostile in the weekly supply and demand meeting (literally screaming and cursing at other functions), say no to great ideas, and yet, are the same people responsible for multiple health code violations, bug infestations, installing equipment that has resulted in drastic product quality compromises (my wife won't even buy foster farms ground turkey anymore because it is so drenched in water and discolored from the new chiller system). And yet promotions all the way to C level abound for these folks while the rest of folks are condemned to wallow away in their roles for all eternity. 4. There is still no career pathing and all of the people who were trying to champion it are now gone. If a position opens up, they will not promote you. When they hire you, they will treat you like gold (anything to get you in). But you will be instantly forgotten, no matter how much you sell, no matter how great your ideas are, no matter how much you grow your business or money you save. They will always look to the outside. And that is why they have a skeleton crew right now. Every employee is ultimately expendable, but this company takes it to a new level. Not only will your great work not matter, but when you try to make a case to move up, they will resort to the lowest of low tactics to demoralize you and put you in your place. For instance: a role recently became available for a promotion. The qualified employee applied. He/she was told they needed to interview. Well, that person was scheduled for 6 interviews over the course of 2 weeks and 4 days, was stood up for the 1st interview by the hiring manager, was given a 5 minute rushed interview by the CEO, a hostile interview by one of the VPs, and a sales leader called this employee's former VP at a different company who was his/her boss years ago when the person was a new hire out of business school to get perspective. Basically they were determined to try to find a reason not to promote that person. And so he/she left, easily based on their business results. But this sort of thing is par for the course at Foster Farms. And that's why there is no one left. The smart people are gone. There are still wonderful people there, some who have been in their roles for over 10 years without promotion. They are still holding out hope that maybe the new CEO will fix things. I hope for their sake she does. But if you are considering a job here, be very afraid. This company's culture has been so run into the ground that it will not change overnight, new leader and all. 5. Be very wary of positive reviews on this site. It is HR trying to improve ratings. Ron Foster had a 50% approval not 6 months ago. Now it's 68%. And things have plummeted in those months. Mass exodus, bonus tanking, cultural upheaval.

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    Advice to Management

    To the new CEO: Find the corrupt forces in operations and get rid of them. It will be hard. They have knowledge that you will depend on. Getting rid of them will be painful. But you have to do it, not just to get rid of the awful behavior that has brought this company down and straight up unethical behavior, but to effect the cultural changes that are so sorely needed. Find the great people that are still... there and do right by them. The best boss I ever had is still at the company. There are folks doing the work of 2 pay grades and levels above them. Promote them, allow them to rebuild for you. It doesn't all need to come from you: just give them the resources to succeed. Completely overhaul HR. Nice people, but completely incompetent. If you want to attract and retain top talent, you need to have HR professionals who are involved, engaged, and know how to structure an organization. These folks are document pushers and yes men. That's it.

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    Foster Farms2016-09-01
  2. Helpful (8)

    "So much potential, but failure imminent"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Foster Farms full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    The people at Director level and below are absolutely fantastic. Kind, caring, collaborative, motivated, and some, particularly in marketing, Category development, R&D, finance, and creative services at the absolute top of their game. It is a family owned business and one definitely gets a family type culture until one has to deal with the VPs and above. Comp is solid at the management level. Work/life balance... is exceptional for those who know how to do their jobs correctly. High levels of autonomy. Amazing brand equity despite recent negative publicity.

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    Cons

    The categories in which the company plays are highly vulnerable to external influences, like the price of corn and soy or avian influenza. Hedges exist to insulate a company like this from some of these forces, but leadership foolishly rolls the dice because it got burned once in the past. This results in bonus projections at the beginning of the year that never materialize, which is very disappointing. The... product portfolio is not diverse which not only exacerbates the above, but also creates additional vulnerabilities. Foster Farms needs other brands in other categories: it's basically Business or Investing 101. Diversify to mitigate risk. The company has been saying for years that it is going to aggressively acquire other businesses, but to date has not. I will get to why that is a problem later. Still, that comes with the territory and that risk would be fine, given how great the overall culture is at the company, except for one thing: there is absolutely zero career planning whatsoever and the company is not a meritocracy. 2 years ago, the company opened a satellite office in the East Bay to attract top talent and succeeded. Despite the health alert which devastated the business, a few of these new managers implemented new tools and strategies which have turned things completely around. Were it not for AI which has interrupted exports and crashed the chicken commodity market, the company would be rolling in money (and to some extent it still is, as while net sales are down, it is making record profits from non core businesses). But none of this great work goes recognized or rewarded. Exceeding if not shattering goals has absolutely zero influence on getting promoted. If you read other reviews on this site, you see a lot of people say that the company hires you, promises you can move quickly if you perform, and then forgets about you. And that is exactly how it is. Sadly, I think many of these new talented managers know that all too well and will leave the company in short order. Heck, one already has. Pretty soon the company will have a shiny new East Bay office with no one in it, because they didn't do one thing to retain the talent they invested so much in to acquire. This will be particularly devastating in the coming years, because the old guard (and yes, the old boys network is very much alive and well here) will all retire and the company will not have seasoned people to back fill. Now to the old guard: while Director and below folks are great, the VPs and above are like an episode of Mad Men. Rude, unprofessional, horrible with people. They don't believe in data. It's all gut instinct and price, and their guts are highly suspect. Poor decisions are made daily based on short term outlooks, which goes counter to what one might expect from a private company. Bad behavior abounds, from inappropriate comments made to women to unsubstantiated finger pointing to straight up lying (particularly on the sales side). These people need to go. But instead of promoting the younger talent who act and operate in a 21st century business mindset, senior leadership continues to ignore bad behavior and not reward good behavior or performance. When leadership positions open, their first inclination is to look to the outside, instead of creating opportunity for qualified and capable folks internally. It's as if they hire you for a role and expect that to be your job for the rest of your life. I'm sure that works out nicely if you are a VP and make a killing despite your ineptitude, but it's the middle managers bringing the ideas and the chops that are making you richer. So what's going to happen when their rainmakers all get fed up with this and leave? That's right. They stop making money too! One would think that the importance of succession planning and retention would be top of mind for these folks out of self preservation alone. But there is an inherent lack of foresight and valuation of people that infect this lot, so much so that they don't know what's good for them. If the leadership made good on its promise to acquire, this would be a non issue. As such, they need to figure something else out to reward and grow their people. Lastly, the cons explained above are further exacerbated by a power vacuum. Our old CEO stepped down a year ago but still sits in and makes the occasional bad decision. There is infighting among with VPs about who will take the role. This will naturally result in someone important leaving. That is, unless the company hires from the outside, which seems to be their MO. Yet another instance of not growing their own people, destined to only result in more people leaving. having many capable people internally. ignbehavior

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    Advice to Management

    Now is the time to act! Reward, recognize, and retain your top talent while you still have them. A promotion need not have a new role. If the employee has exceeded expectations, promote them in place or figure out a rotation scheme. Get rid of the bad people who aren't performing or behave in ways inconsistent with common decency, professionalism, etc. Stop thinking so short term! This industry is all about... the long game. There are going to be ups and downs, but if you have happy, motivated people, you will ultimately succeed. This company can win. Get back to your core values and put people first. The money will follow.

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    Foster Farms2015-08-11
  3. Helpful (7)

    "Not a place for the well-intentioned"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Marketing Management 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Foster Farms full-time

    Pros

    1) Well known & trusted brand on the West Coast. 2) Lucky to still hang on to the magical success of the "Imposters" TV campaign established more than a decade ago.

    Cons

    1) Bad behavior (sometimes very bad) happens here and is routinely ignored, allowed, and quietly justified up to the highest levels of management where someone should know better. 2) Leadership is weak & cross-functional alignment runs surface deep with unspoken opposing agendas causing constant internal tension & distrust. 3) While a vision for expansive CPG growth has been touted by marketing/sales leadership &... CEO, it is little more than a presentation with placeholder initiatives that rely on cross-functional alignment & resources that are not part of reality at Foster Farms. 4) Good ol' boys club that is overly operations & efficiency focused with little weight of organizational effort placed on what it will take to change & grow. 5) Brand rested on its past success and fell behind the times.

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    Advice to Management

    STOP PRETENDING. 1) Find a vision with a plan that you truly can & will support cross-functionally. 2) Don't try to be something that you aren't... change the culture or stop recruiting growth focused new hires who will not fit, not be supported, and merely increase cross-functional tension and frustration for all involved. 4) Start addressing bad behavior & replace those who allow it to go on

    Foster Farms2015-08-21
  4. Helpful (4)

    "Not what it was even a few years ago. Bad leadership and culture"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Marketing Manager in Livingston, CA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I have been working at Foster Farms for more than a year

    Pros

    Foster Farms is a company in turmoil and unsure of its own identity or role in the CPG world. The Foster Farms brand is strong and has a great following and equity but times are passing this once vibrant company by. There are certainly some good products and people but even those are dated.

    Cons

    The overarching word for Foster Farms is political corruption. The company is basically run by several of the 'good old boys' that have been there for ages. Good/hard work does not matter at all here. What gets you promoted is who you know. Promotions are not based on merit but rather politics. Bad behavior is routinely rewarded. There is a really bad vibe in the new office that is being caused by very bad... management at the top. I would not recommend working here unless you plan on coming to Livingston and becoming part of the network. HR is not to be trusted here at all.

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    Advice to Management

    Check your egos at the door

    Foster Farms2015-07-29
Found 154 reviews