HubShout "entry level" Reviews | Glassdoor.co.in

HubShout Employee Reviews about "entry level"

Updated 26 Aug 2019

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3.8
73%
Recommend to a Friend
79%
Approve of CEO
HubShout CEO and Co-Founder Chad Hill (no image)
Chad Hill
47 Ratings
Pros
  • "But opening up to other writers, editors, and managers helps so much(in 10 reviews)

  • "The freedom to work from home or a coffee shop every once in a while is great(in 8 reviews)

Cons
  • "Not only were writers expected to meet quota every week, but there became a heavier focus on(in 18 reviews)

  • "Though it is true that the Premium Writer position is an entry-level job, the low pay also became difficult to live on(in 9 reviews)

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Reviews about "entry level"

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  1. Helpful (1)

    "Premium Writer Position at HubShout"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Premium Writer 

    I worked at HubShout full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    HubShout was my first place of employment out of college and it’s certainly an experience I will never forget. The company offers a casual and collaborative work environment and members from different teams have opportunities to work together on various problems and projects. There is a huge focus on building a strong team and overall culture, which I really loved. There are happy hours and company events, which added to the fun environment of the office. The people I got to work with were my favorite part of the job. I built great friendships within the company and everyone was always friendly to each other. Especially within the content team, I felt as though I was part of a family. The content team leaders do a good job of letting writers know that they’re there to provide support whenever and however they can. Writers do have the opportunity to work from home after a few months, which was a major benefit of the job. Without this ability, I don’t think I would have stayed as long as I did. I learned so much from this job -- from the basics of SEO to how to be a better leader. HubShout was a great place to learn the basics of digital marketing and enter the professional world.

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    Cons

    Unfortunately, a ping-pong table and happy hours weren’t enough to make me want to stay at HubShout. For being an entry-level position, the premium writer role has a very heavy workload. Over time, this workload became immensely difficult to sustain. And despite writers being very open with management regarding the stress associated with the workload, no efforts were made to change this -- in fact, writers were encouraged to try to find ways to reduce the quota themselves, which ultimately increased stress. Furthermore, writers were consistently encouraged to exceed quota, which added unnecessary pressure. Not only were writers expected to meet quota every week, but there became a heavier focus on writers participating in innovation and projects outside of writing, which was initially not part of the job description -- while it was always encouraged, it became clear that innovation was now an expectation that ultimately impacted the yearly bonus and overall job performance reviews. This expectation, again, increased stress, as writers had to take away time from writing to participate in various projects. The pay for the Premium Writer position is far below average for this type of work. While employees are eligible for a hefty bonus at the end of the year, if they meet the company's expectations, this does not make up for the low wages throughout the year. As the company grows, I hope writers are compensated more fairly for their work. Additionally, there is not much room for growth from the writer position. While there were internal promotions during my time with the company, they were few and far between.

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    Advice to Management

    Overall, my experience with HubShout was positive. However, during my almost two years with HubShout, both the company and my job changed -- which is to be expected over time, but I found that I was no longer a good fit for the position and vice versa. If/when management does decide to hire more writers, they should consider changing the job description to better fit the additional responsibilities writers have been asked to take on. And, of course, writers should be better compensated for taking on these additional responsibilities outside of writing. The more time I spent at HubShout, the more I noticed a divide between the writers and the rest of the company -- I always felt less valued and appreciated than other employees. I highly encourage management to make sure their writers feel valued. Unfortunately, I left this job feeling much less valued than I did when I started. Please remember that your writers are humans, not just part of a content machine. After all, without writers, there is no HubShout.

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    HubShout2019-08-26
  2. "nice"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee 

    I worked at HubShout full-time

    Pros

    great coworkers, cool office space, opportunity for remote

    Cons

    pay is low, workload is high, not impossible tho. it's entry level so it's to be expected

    HubShout2018-11-30
  3. Helpful (2)

    "Premium Writer"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Premium Writer in Rochester, NY
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at HubShout full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    HubShout is a great place to launch a marketing career. It is a casual and engaging workplace, and management encourages collaboration at all levels. The company is team-oriented and employees truly do have an opportunity to have their voices heard. I made lasting connections at HubShout and admire my former coworkers for their drive. If you are at the beginning of your career and are looking for a place to learn about SEO and content writing, this may be the job for you. While working at HubShout, you do not need to worry about simply being a name on a screen. If they choose to do so, every employee can be part of the company culture and business development process. As for the Premium Writer position specifically, the job offers a lot of flexibility. After a certain amount of time at the company, writers can work remotely, allowing you to adapt to your own creative process. This was a huge perk of the job, and it allows you to save your PTO.

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    Cons

    While HubShout overall can be an enjoyable place to work, especially for the young professional, the content writer job is difficult to sustain. Writers are required to complete a high volume of work in an unrealistic amount of time. Over time, this demand took a serious toll on my mental and physical health. While the management team was aware of this stress, there was no sense of urgency to change the writing quota or job structure. Rather, writers were encouraged to work on projects to make changes themselves -- only to find that this commitment cut into writing time. Overall, the relationship between management and the writers was strong, as the entire content team meets twice per week. However, the lines between horizontal and top-down leadership were often blurred. During the end of my time at HubShout, I noticed that many decisions were being made within the editorial and management team, rather than including the writers. This move away from horizontal structure played a role in my choice to leave the company. Though it is true that the Premium Writer position is an entry-level job, the low pay also became difficult to live on. Any applicants should be aware of this when considering the job.

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    Advice to Management

    As a human and a professional, I want to encourage all managers to observe and listen to the writers. I know that my experience was not isolated, and I truly believe that writing for HubShout could be an enriching experience if the writers were valued. The reality is that the sheer amount of stress will drive writers out for years to come, and it's up to management to decide whether they want retention. I would also encourage management to be wary of the startup label, especially after 10 years in business. HubShout has the potential to grow and be a wonderful place to work. From employee compensation to training procedures, there are opportunities to show that the company is invested in its workers and future. While this may take radical change, I believe HubShout can lower turnover and help ideas grow.

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    HubShout2018-02-28
  4. Helpful (4)

    "Very disappointing experience"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
     
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at HubShout

    Pros

    Casual dress and you’ll learn a lot about digital marketing, especially SEO.

    Cons

    Imagine the worst day you’ve ever had at a job in your life. Now, multiply that by 100 and have that be your day everyday...that’s HubShout. If you are looking for a long term career, this is not the place for it. HubShout is a very entry level and the company is not growing and does not know how to grow. Part of the reason for this is management never has your back. Prepare to continuously be thrown under the bus to the resellers you work with, management will always side with them regardless if they are wrong, sometimes even blatantly. The President and CEO have no loyalty to any of their employees, everyone in their eyes are replaceable. Perhaps the absolute worst part of the job was how micromanaged everyone was. It got to the point where employees banded together to demand they stop QAing so many tasks. I guarantee this job would be the most micromanagement you’ll ever experience in any job in your lifetime. Writer turnover is mind-boggling and frankly the owners don’t care. The company’s CRM system has horrible UI/UX that both employees, resellers and end-clients can not use to its’ full potential. Meetings accomplish nothing. For example, you’ll be subjected to an interesting TED Talk about an important and intriguing topic. Instead of having a thought provoking discussion regarding the video afterwards, the meeting promptly ends. It just turned into a waste of time. They claim to strive to have their own employees have purpose filled employment, which sounds good but on paper but it does not live up to it’s hype. On the Account Management side, they emphasize a team effort but it’s all a facade. If you miss a day for whatever reason, forget about having anyone covering your work yet if something happens, it will be your fault. Management is clueless. They are so busy checking your communications with resellers and listening to phone recordings that they don’t notice employees leaving the office...on the clock...to go to the bar down the street on East Avenue for hours at a time.

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    Advice to Management

    The reseller business model overall is difficult for a plethora of reasons but you yourself were the biggest problem. Stop micromanaging and let your team do their jobs.

    HubShout2016-10-17
  5. Helpful (10)

    ""Big Business" Disguised as a Startup"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Premium Writer in Rochester, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at HubShout full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Other employees are typically young professionals which can make the social aspect enjoyable. The title looks great on a resume. Writing did improve. Learned a lot about SEO.

    Cons

    The high turnover rate for writers and how long it has gone unresolved is thoroughly unsettling. Management acknowledges that there must be some problem behind it, and continues to ask for suggestions about what it is and how to resolve it. However, everyone is well aware the root problem is the absurd workload, at least in the long term, and yet it remains to be swept under the table by higher-ups. Employees in other departments are understandably hesitant to get to know new writers within their first few months considering they’ve seen so many come and go after just those few months, and in many cases only weeks. In my first two months of employment, four people left, and five people were hired. This all from a team of 10 to 12 writers. To make matters worse, management decided to increase the workload even further. This in and of itself is one thing, but management purposely worded the announcement to manipulate us into thinking the work load had been decreased from 48 tasks per week, to 45. In reality, depending on the meetings you had scheduled for that week, the quota had been raised to 50 tasks per week. During the few months I was there after the change, not once did management even utter “50”, in an attempt to keep up the charade. To top it off, they also added wordpress posting duties, which were interesting and useful experience, but were taking up more time that we didn't have. When the writers banded together to push for changes that would make the position more realistic, every easily solvable point was addressed, such as more workspace and free coffee. But these were only smoke-screens, seeing that no attempt was made by management to address the new quota: The biggest issue we put forward. Other important points, including the enormous stress from the workload and the health concerns it generated, were immediately brushed off with a simple,"well then you probably shouldn't work here." In individual cases, that may very well be the case. However, with multiple similar complaints, it should be obvious there is a major issue. If you are having trouble keeping up with the workload, their method of helping you get back on track is to essentially to toss you in a ditch and see if you can drag your way out, all while looming under the threat of immediate termination. If for some crazy reason that first stint doesn’t motivate you in the long term, they simply continue to dig the ditch deeper until success is practically unfeasible so they can push you out. If you are willing to put your integrity aside, you can definitely brown nose your way to the top and do very well at this company. No one could blame you considering the current scarcity of jobs, so more power to you. However, if sucking up isn’t your thing, you could also write complete dribble as long as you write a ton of it, and do just as well. On the other end of the spectrum, going out of the way to increase brand awareness and other higher-quality content creation strategies, which have been proven to be more effective than the shear quantity of keywords, will be seen as insubordination and laziness if the full quota is not always met. They say that quality is the staple of their business, but in the end, every employee is quantified only by a number on a spreadsheet. This all is able to happen thanks to the “inspirational,” but hollow words spewed by management. Many seem directly ripped from a TED talk which can be good, but only if you follow up and understand the true motivation behind the advice, rather than using it as a tool to make yourself look progressive. Upper management is open to listening to new ideas, feedback, and complaints, but that doesn’t always mean the issues will be addressed. Higher-ups even attempt to reassure you are being heard by documenting what you say word-for-word during meetings. However, I came to realize that your words were often later used against you as well. Some of management is well educated in business psychology, which is obvious from the cheap business tactics used to manipulate employees they want to get rid of into believing they had, “had no choice but to punish/fire you.” This is so common, that they are able to boast a very low rate of actual termination. However, this is only because they make the work so difficult for those that are struggling, that naturally they will quit before they can be fired. I don't necessarily want to blame all of management for this, because it's obvious their hands are tied in some of these situations. No one can really afford to lose their job nowadays. The bottom line is that high writer turnover is essentially ingrained in their business strategy at this point. They have a constant line of potential hires ready to fill any vacancy that may occur. Because finding a writing position or entry-level job in general is so difficult, they know they can continue to do this for the foreseeable future. Although, if you feel you can write mindlessly all-day everyday, then go for it. This is probably a good job for you. As you may have noticed, there is a surprising disparity in reviews for the writing positions, always being rated at either a one-two star, or a five star. Considering this is a content generating company, it’s pretty safe to say the majority of positive reviews are either fake or an attempt by former employees at getting a better reference in the future. Just more shady business tactics. The owners come from a long history of working with big businesses, and are using the same strategies at a small startup. If they remain on this trend, they may very well be headed for disaster. It would already seem they have backed themselves into a corner where they can’t afford to lower the quota anymore. Apparently constantly losing and training new employees makes up for it? The writers, the ones making the actual product, are seriously undervalued, as well as exploited. There’s no room for empathy in big business. Even with just 50 employees, you won’t receive much at HubShout either.

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    Advice to Management

    Employees are more than a number on a spreadsheet.

    HubShout2016-04-29
  6. Helpful (1)

    "Wasn't Right for Me, Might Be for Someone Else"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Premium Content Writer in Rochester, NY

    I worked at HubShout full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    The best thing about HubShout, hands down, is the people working there. They're smart and funny and weird in the best possible way. It's a casual office culture (no really, you can wear your sweatpants), which wasn't a particular draw for me, but might be for others. Management is also pretty good at listening to concerns, and I saw the working environment get about 10 times better just in the year that I was working there. Writers can also work from home under certain conditions, which was a major perk for me -- especially in winter! Leadership is also really open to you doing cool little side projects, which can break up the routine and allow you to use past experience or unique skill sets in a different context. I also have to give a shout-out to Adam, the president of the company, who I think handled a recent crisis extraordinarily well. When the writing team was completely overloaded, he was literally bringing us snacks to try to ease the burden. Not many company presidents would do that.

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    Cons

    My job wasn't a bad job, it just wasn't a good fit for me. I didn't feel the writing quota was difficult to reach, but I found it really difficult to stay motivated because I just didn't like what I was doing. Coming from journalism, I felt that some of the tactics were a little sketchy; however, within the arena of content marketing, HubShout is pretty admirable and solidly in white-hat territory. The pay felt low to me because it was actually less than I was making prior to grad school, but it's not bad for entry level -- management is pretty up front about it being an entry-level job, and it's not their fault I took it despite being technically overqualified. I will say that there isn't much of a promotion track just because of the nature of the work, but I probably wouldn't have stayed much longer anyway because I wouldn't have been happy even with a better-paying job in online marketing. Due to my general unhappiness in the field, I let little frustrations get overwhelming, but I think they're the kind of little frustrations (inefficiency, miscommunication) that you'll have in any working environment. My leaving for another job is truly an it's-not-you-it's-me situation. I really hated this job and found it soul-crushing, but I guess that's not surprising since I took a job in a field that I didn't actually want to work in.

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    Advice to Management

    There are two things that would have made a big difference to me: 1) Sick days. You have to use PTO when you're sick, which means that a lot of people just don't stay out of the office. Then the germs spread and everybody is sick and miserable and probably not as productive as they could be. I would have been perfectly happy to take unpaid sick days, and it was never satisfactorily explained to me why that wasn't an option (since it wouldn't cost the company anything). 2) Quarterly bonuses. While the Christmas bonus I got last year was, indeed, very generous, I didn't like that the promise of a yearly bonus was wielded as basically the standard response to every question about low pay or motivation to go above and beyond. While I left HubShout unexpectedly due to a spur-of-the-moment opportunity, I was already planning to resign before the holidays. I was still trying to do more than the minimum purely for ethical reasons, but it is tough to see that once-a-year bonus as a real motivator in a company where there's pretty high turnover. Other than that, keep doing what you're doing, especially with the team-building efforts! I didn't get to say all this because I left so much more abruptly than I intended, but I truly wish everyone at HubShout the best.

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    HubShout2015-09-18
  7. Helpful (1)

    "Life at the Hub as a Premium Content Writer"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Premium Content Writer in Rochester, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at HubShout full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Perhaps one of the most notable perks about working at HubShout -- and one that nearly ever reviewer has mentioned -- is the casual, laid back atmosphere. They do not care how you dress, how many body modifications you have, or how you style your hair. It's refreshing to work for a company that doesn't attach your value as an employee -- or person -- to your appearance! However, what they DO care about is your work performance, level of professionalism, and job satisfaction. The owner of the company has always been adamant about this and is extremely open minded. Another plus is the ability to refine your existing skills and learn new ones. There are plenty of opportunities to learn, you simply have to ask. You may have to ask more than once, however if you're in good standing with the company, management will go out of their way to educate you. Though I was a content writer, I expressed great interest in learning more about the Google algorithm and SEO in general. Adam created an entire weekly "class" to teach me and anyone else who was interested simply because I requested to learn more. Treat HubShout as a career, and not simply a job and you'll be able to reap more benefits. Simply put, you get out what you put in.

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    Cons

    Meeting the weekly quota was stressful at times. Again, by expressing this concern to management multiple times an entirely new system to offset the quota when warranted was created. Even so, the metrics required of writers were difficult to reach, however not at all impossible. As with many other workplaces, HubShout is a deadline-driven work environment. If you express your concerns to management early, it won't be a problem. In regards to pay, it's an entry level position that does pay slightly more than most. Work hard, meet your metrics, and you'll receive a sizable Christmas bonus that helps to offset the entry-level pay.

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    Advice to Management

    Within the year I was employed as a full time employee at HubShout, there were several positive changes. Therefore, I cannot give any parting advice to management because they've already implemented a lot of the changes I requested. My advice to current and future employees is be assertive and professional. Express your concerns or difficulties in articulately and reasonably and management will literally bend over backwards to ensure you succeed!

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    HubShout2015-07-21
  8. Helpful (1)

    "Great people"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
     
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at HubShout

    Pros

    This is a great company. I can't say enough about the people. Everybody is friendly and works very hard. They are all motivated to see the company make it. There are a ton of social events and many people in the office are friends. The company lets you be yourself and encourages teamwork.

    Cons

    The jobs are mostly entry level. But I knew that going in. It really helped me get a great second job and the training opportunity was amazing. I really don't think I would have my current job if not for HubShout. Also, I'm still friends with many people I worked with.

    Advice to Management

    Don't let the competition get you down. You have strong people, keep encouraging them. Keep promoting from within (as you have been), it helps people see where they can go if they work hard.

    HubShout2015-06-23
  9. Helpful (6)

    "Great first job"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
     
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at HubShout

    Pros

    I found the people and culture to be solid. I liked everyone and the atmosphere was very relaxed. You can take breaks whenever you want and dress is casual.

    Cons

    The training was slower than I would have liked. My first week seems to take forever. But things picked up and I got real busy and time passed. It was clear that this was an entry-level job. But I was okay with that. I would be nice to have more advancement at the company.

    Advice to Management

    Keep growing and listening to employees.

    HubShout2014-12-09
Found 9 reviews