HubShout Employee Reviews about "free coffee"

Updated 29 Apr 2016

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3.8
73%
Recommend to a Friend
79%
Approve of CEO
HubShout CEO and Co-Founder Chad Hill (no image)
Chad Hill
47 Ratings
Pros
  • "But opening up to other writers, editors, and managers helps so much(in 10 reviews)

  • "The freedom to work from home or a coffee shop every once in a while is great(in 8 reviews)

Cons
  • "Though it is true that the Premium Writer position is an entry-level job, the low pay also became difficult to live on(in 9 reviews)

  • "No Free coffee but they provide the keureg, Cream & sugar(in 4 reviews)

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Reviews about "free coffee"

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  1. Helpful (10)

    ""Big Business" Disguised as a Startup"

    1.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Premium Writer in Rochester, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at HubShout full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Other employees are typically young professionals which can make the social aspect enjoyable. The title looks great on a resume. Writing did improve. Learned a lot about SEO.

    Cons

    The high turnover rate for writers and how long it has gone unresolved is thoroughly unsettling. Management acknowledges that there must be some problem behind it, and continues to ask for suggestions about what it is and how to resolve it. However, everyone is well aware the root problem is the absurd workload, at least in the long term, and yet it remains to be swept under the table by higher-ups. Employees in other departments are understandably hesitant to get to know new writers within their first few months considering they’ve seen so many come and go after just those few months, and in many cases only weeks. In my first two months of employment, four people left, and five people were hired. This all from a team of 10 to 12 writers. To make matters worse, management decided to increase the workload even further. This in and of itself is one thing, but management purposely worded the announcement to manipulate us into thinking the work load had been decreased from 48 tasks per week, to 45. In reality, depending on the meetings you had scheduled for that week, the quota had been raised to 50 tasks per week. During the few months I was there after the change, not once did management even utter “50”, in an attempt to keep up the charade. To top it off, they also added wordpress posting duties, which were interesting and useful experience, but were taking up more time that we didn't have. When the writers banded together to push for changes that would make the position more realistic, every easily solvable point was addressed, such as more workspace and free coffee. But these were only smoke-screens, seeing that no attempt was made by management to address the new quota: The biggest issue we put forward. Other important points, including the enormous stress from the workload and the health concerns it generated, were immediately brushed off with a simple,"well then you probably shouldn't work here." In individual cases, that may very well be the case. However, with multiple similar complaints, it should be obvious there is a major issue. If you are having trouble keeping up with the workload, their method of helping you get back on track is to essentially to toss you in a ditch and see if you can drag your way out, all while looming under the threat of immediate termination. If for some crazy reason that first stint doesn’t motivate you in the long term, they simply continue to dig the ditch deeper until success is practically unfeasible so they can push you out. If you are willing to put your integrity aside, you can definitely brown nose your way to the top and do very well at this company. No one could blame you considering the current scarcity of jobs, so more power to you. However, if sucking up isn’t your thing, you could also write complete dribble as long as you write a ton of it, and do just as well. On the other end of the spectrum, going out of the way to increase brand awareness and other higher-quality content creation strategies, which have been proven to be more effective than the shear quantity of keywords, will be seen as insubordination and laziness if the full quota is not always met. They say that quality is the staple of their business, but in the end, every employee is quantified only by a number on a spreadsheet. This all is able to happen thanks to the “inspirational,” but hollow words spewed by management. Many seem directly ripped from a TED talk which can be good, but only if you follow up and understand the true motivation behind the advice, rather than using it as a tool to make yourself look progressive. Upper management is open to listening to new ideas, feedback, and complaints, but that doesn’t always mean the issues will be addressed. Higher-ups even attempt to reassure you are being heard by documenting what you say word-for-word during meetings. However, I came to realize that your words were often later used against you as well. Some of management is well educated in business psychology, which is obvious from the cheap business tactics used to manipulate employees they want to get rid of into believing they had, “had no choice but to punish/fire you.” This is so common, that they are able to boast a very low rate of actual termination. However, this is only because they make the work so difficult for those that are struggling, that naturally they will quit before they can be fired. I don't necessarily want to blame all of management for this, because it's obvious their hands are tied in some of these situations. No one can really afford to lose their job nowadays. The bottom line is that high writer turnover is essentially ingrained in their business strategy at this point. They have a constant line of potential hires ready to fill any vacancy that may occur. Because finding a writing position or entry-level job in general is so difficult, they know they can continue to do this for the foreseeable future. Although, if you feel you can write mindlessly all-day everyday, then go for it. This is probably a good job for you. As you may have noticed, there is a surprising disparity in reviews for the writing positions, always being rated at either a one-two star, or a five star. Considering this is a content generating company, it’s pretty safe to say the majority of positive reviews are either fake or an attempt by former employees at getting a better reference in the future. Just more shady business tactics. The owners come from a long history of working with big businesses, and are using the same strategies at a small startup. If they remain on this trend, they may very well be headed for disaster. It would already seem they have backed themselves into a corner where they can’t afford to lower the quota anymore. Apparently constantly losing and training new employees makes up for it? The writers, the ones making the actual product, are seriously undervalued, as well as exploited. There’s no room for empathy in big business. Even with just 50 employees, you won’t receive much at HubShout either.

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    HubShout Response

    May 3, 2016President

    Hi there. We were very sorry to read your review. As you pointed out, we are listening very closely to all feedback and believe strongly that all voices should be heard. We are also sorry that the workload was an issue for you. We work very hard to make sure people know the requirements before they ever accept a job with us. We put the workload requirements in the job postings. They are again emphasized in the interview, and once again in training. We believe in honesty and communication, especially when it comes to workload expectations. But you are right, everybody is asked to work hard at our company. You are also correct, the turnover on the writer team has been deeply troubling. We are working very hard to address it. There have been at least 10 meetings on this topic over the last 90 days. Writers have been involved in every decision and have done a great job at coming up with creative solutions. They have launched all sorts of new approaches to address stress. A few examples. The Writer Team now has informal support groups (called Coffee Talks) where they share ideas for managing stress. A member from the writer team started a Gratitude Exercise that has helped people find positivity in their lives. After the first 4 weeks, it was so popular that they are running it again - now with twice as many participants. Another writer has offered to lead meditation sessions. As you know, we've had a work-from-home program (full-time) for writers for several years. All writers are given 10% of the time every week to pursue whatever growth and skills training they want. I know one writer is getting Adwords certified. Others pursue SEO training. And some invent their own growth plan. And finally, the writer team has been instrumental in our decision to allow dogs at work - which has been a big hit (and stress reducer). All employees at HubShout have been invited in to our company-wide strategy sessions over the last 2 months to define where they want to see the company go over the next 5 years. These are not lip-service meetings. The meetings are employee-facilitated. In these sessions, every employee gets a vote - no matter what their level. All dissenting opinions are heard, and consensus is found through respectful discussion and listening. The feedback has been extremely positive and we've seen new leaders emerge who are now running major initiatives with massive amounts of autonomy. Again - We are very sorry this position did not work out for you. But we are extremely proud of our writers, and of our employees. We have all-hands meetings every week to recognize the outstanding performance of our team. They have built the strong culture we have at HubShout and made us a leader in our field.

  2. Helpful (5)

    "Great Company Overall"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Internet Analyst in Rochester, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at HubShout full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Always surrounded by smart People. The company is still in a very fast growth stage. Extremly casual dress code along with easy going atmosphere. Cool monthly incentives cash or gift cards for top performers. NO Micromanagement!

    Cons

    Pay could be slightly better but end of the year bonus's help offset the lower salary. No Free coffee but they provide the keureg, Cream & sugar.

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  3. Helpful (5)

    "Small company getting bigger"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Account Manager in Rochester, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at HubShout full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Dress is extremely casual and I NEVER get called on weekends. Team is fun (mostly) and income potential is strong. I have tons of freedom. nobody in my face all the time like some jobs.

    Cons

    Wish there was free coffee. Sometimes there is construction noise in our building, making it hard to hear clients on the phone.

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  4. Helpful (7)

    "Great place to work."

    4.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Account Manager in Rochester, NY
    Positive Outlook

    I have been working at HubShout full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Great environment. Opportunity. Everyone is respected. Small but growing company. Interesting product in a growing space. Employees are very involved in product development. Owners are available.

    Cons

    No free coffee. Long hours. Training is lacking, but this is understandable for a small company.

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