HubShout Employee Reviews about "writers"

Updated 17 Oct 2019

To filter reviews, or .
3.8
73%
Recommend to a Friend
79%
Approve of CEO
HubShout CEO and Co-Founder Chad Hill (no image)
Chad Hill
47 Ratings
Pros
  • "But opening up to other writers, editors, and managers helps so much(in 10 reviews)

  • "The freedom to work from home or a coffee shop every once in a while is great(in 8 reviews)

Cons
  • "Though it is true that the Premium Writer position is an entry-level job, the low pay also became difficult to live on(in 9 reviews)

  • "No Free coffee but they provide the keureg, Cream & sugar(in 4 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

Reviews about "writers"

Return to all Reviews
  1. "It's Been a Blast and Gets Better Every Year"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Writer/Editor/Utility Person in Rochester, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at HubShout full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    The team. The entire team at HubShout is so easy to get along with, very welcoming to everyone, and will drop everything/shift schedules around to help. The support. This job can certainly get tough. Especially starting out as a writer. But opening up to other writers, editors, and managers helps so much. Early on if I was struggling, I would try and hide it and just power through. That rarely worked. It took a bit for me to open up but once I did, I realized I could let anyone know that I'm having trouble with something and they would do all they could to help. Sometimes just simply talking out frustrations helped a lot. But I've seen multiple people drop everything just to help myself or another person overcome a challenge. The freedom. The freedom to work from home or a coffee shop every once in a while is great. But the freedom to pursue all kinds of projects and activities is really outstanding. If you have an idea that will help the company -- even if it means drastically changing the way things are done -- you're encouraged to go for it. Similarly, if you have a fun idea that will improve the culture -- you have the go-ahead from everyone to organize whatever event you want!

    Cons

    The pay can be tough after a while. However, as we grow, they do a great job of prioritizing not only keeping everyone onboard, but offering all kinds of promotional opportunities. Felt burnout a lot early on, too. But after learning new things, I started feeling much more comfortable and a lot more energized on different tasks.

    Continue reading
  2. Helpful (1)

    "Premium Writer Position at HubShout"

    3.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Premium Writer 

    I worked at HubShout full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    HubShout was my first place of employment out of college and it’s certainly an experience I will never forget. The company offers a casual and collaborative work environment and members from different teams have opportunities to work together on various problems and projects. There is a huge focus on building a strong team and overall culture, which I really loved. There are happy hours and company events, which added to the fun environment of the office. The people I got to work with were my favorite part of the job. I built great friendships within the company and everyone was always friendly to each other. Especially within the content team, I felt as though I was part of a family. The content team leaders do a good job of letting writers know that they’re there to provide support whenever and however they can. Writers do have the opportunity to work from home after a few months, which was a major benefit of the job. Without this ability, I don’t think I would have stayed as long as I did. I learned so much from this job -- from the basics of SEO to how to be a better leader. HubShout was a great place to learn the basics of digital marketing and enter the professional world.

    Cons

    Unfortunately, a ping-pong table and happy hours weren’t enough to make me want to stay at HubShout. For being an entry-level position, the premium writer role has a very heavy workload. Over time, this workload became immensely difficult to sustain. And despite writers being very open with management regarding the stress associated with the workload, no efforts were made to change this -- in fact, writers were encouraged to try to find ways to reduce the quota themselves, which ultimately increased stress. Furthermore, writers were consistently encouraged to exceed quota, which added unnecessary pressure. Not only were writers expected to meet quota every week, but there became a heavier focus on writers participating in innovation and projects outside of writing, which was initially not part of the job description -- while it was always encouraged, it became clear that innovation was now an expectation that ultimately impacted the yearly bonus and overall job performance reviews. This expectation, again, increased stress, as writers had to take away time from writing to participate in various projects. The pay for the Premium Writer position is far below average for this type of work. While employees are eligible for a hefty bonus at the end of the year, if they meet the company's expectations, this does not make up for the low wages throughout the year. As the company grows, I hope writers are compensated more fairly for their work. Additionally, there is not much room for growth from the writer position. While there were internal promotions during my time with the company, they were few and far between.

    Continue reading

    HubShout Response

    August 27, 2019President

    Hi! Thanks so much for posting. We feel so much gratitude for the hard work you put in at the company and can't thank you enough for both your long tenure and sharing this feedback. This is a great perspective. We completely agree with you. We have a serious problem with the workload as it is currently constructed for writers. As you mentioned, we have been openly discussing this as a team for a while. The team is hard at work, considering some radically different ways for content production. There are several experiments running as I type that could completely change the structure of our jobs. It is our hope that this innovation will address the issues you raise. Thanks also for your kind words about our inclusivity and culture. That is a central focus for us. Our close ties and "family feel" is why we have been so successful for so long. Thanks again for your feedback!


  3. Helpful (12)

    "Incredibly overworked and severely underpaid - what writer life at HubShout is like."

    1.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Content Writer in Rochester, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at HubShout full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    The writers and account managers are very friendly, and it was a pleasure getting to know them. However, the only reason I (and probably other writers) continue(d) to stick around is because of the flexibility of being able to work from home. Working remotely and being able to build up a small portfolio (I do mean small - 99% of the work is ghostwriting) are literally the only redeeming qualities of this job. Don't stick around for longer than you absolutely HAVE to - this company does NOT deserve your hard work.

    Cons

    In all honesty, this job took away my passion for my craft and my confidence in myself. Here's why: Once you prove to management that you're a competent writer who can handle deadlines, they'll work you as hard as they possibly can by asking you to take on extra duties without any type of additional compensation, quota reduction, or even acknowledgement. You're expected to complete 45 articles ('tasks') per week, with about 400 words per article (They told us that's one article every 48 minutes. Are we robots?). Sure, some of the featured news can be grouped together and written as one longer article, but you're writing an absolute minimum of 40 articles per week. That doesn't even include extra duties, like calls with clients, attending meetings, posting articles on Wordpress, making agendas for meetings, gathering topics and arranging editorial calendars...and the list goes on. Raises are virtually unheard of here. Instead, they give out 'bonuses' at the end of the year based on what's essentially an arbitrary rating of performance. Both years I was there, I was robbed of my bonus by a mere few hundredths of a point after being told repeatedly that I was 'on track' to receive a good bonus that year and hitting goal virtually every single week I worked there (exceeding goal many weeks as well). How's that for a blow to morale? Even the very nature of some of the work here seems questionable. For example, when we're on the phone with clients, we're typically supposed to avoid any mention of the word 'HubShout' due to the white-label nature of the business. Essentially, we're lying to our customers and making them think we're working for the reseller's company - the other agency involved in the transaction. It's a complicated mess. If the people paying for these services actually knew the mindset and amount of knowledge the writers have of most of the subjects they write about, they'd probably take their business elsewhere. Writers have to deal with some of the most complicated and technical subjects for incredibly niche industries that it's impossible to learn enough to write an article with a quick Google search. That, in and of itself, makes the job inherently unsustainable. To add insult to injury, the 'culture' (I use the word loosely because I never felt any sense of it) is greatly diminished by the very nature of the writers' jobs. Any time a 'fun' workplace event is scheduled, most writers are unable to attend because we have too much work - there was never a quota reduction offered, and if we went, we'd end up missing goal and getting greatly penalized. Any time writers asked about a quota reduction, they'd get told "I don't know - let me ask and get back to you" without ever hearing back. Seriously, what's the point of going to a "fun" event during work hours if you just have to rush even more later in the week to make up for it? As far as I know, no other employees had this issue other than the writers. All the Bob Ross painting events in the world can't make up for the absolutely atrocious way this company treats their writers. We were brushed under the rug and dismissed with each and every one of our concerns, without fail. Even the editors, who started as writers and should've understood our struggle, didn't hear out our concerns or advocate for our wellbeing in any real way, which is incredibly disappointing, to say the least. Instead, they just point out tiny ways you can still improve (even though you're taking on a heavier workload without a higher pay) and tell you to "manage your time better" or "work harder," frowning upon anyone who asks for any type of help or quota reduction (yes, I literally got penalized for this, even though I only needed that help because of all the extra work I was taking on). They never cease to focus on the small things you're doing wrong over the countless things you're doing RIGHT. It was only after I spent two years here and had been taking on an abundance of extra tasks that I perpetually started to fall behind because asking for help was seen as a sign of weakness. I finally drew the line and flat-out quit when the extra tasks I was taking on as a senior writer became far too much to handle - especially at the poverty wage level of $12.20/hr. I could walk into almost any grocery store or fast food restaurant, fresh out of high school, without a degree and make more than that per hour. Anyone with a heart or even an ounce of decency in their soul knows that those rates are flat-out extortion with this type and level of workload. This company doesn't deserve to be successful while taking such cruel advantage of younger workers just trying to get their foot in the door. (And yes, they do aim to hire younger workers, presumably so they can drastically underpay them - I recall there being an initiative to make HubShout the "best place to work for recent grads.") I could go on and on about the injustices witnessed during my time at HubShout; this is just the beginning. Fortunately, I was able to easily find a drastically better remote job that pays twice the salary of HubShout, and other writers surely can, too. I'm sure the CEO will formulate some articulate response to this review in an attempt to smooth things over and save face for the company like he always does. But everything I've written here is true - the company outwardly looks as if it prioritizes the culture and the overall wellbeing of employees, but it absolutely does not - it's all a carefully crafted illusion. The bottom line is this: writers, don't stop your job search once you get hired here. There are plenty of other options out there that will pay you what you're worth with a much more reasonable workload. Use the stress at this job as motivation to find a better one. And above all, don't let the terrible management make you lose passion for your craft. You deserve a job that treats you fairly, and you absolutely will not find it at HubShout.

    Continue reading

    HubShout Response

    May 25, 2019President

    Hi! Thanks for providing such thorough feedback. We are a values-driven company with a huge emphasis on mutual respect and listening. As such, we always welcome feedback - even when it is very negative. We have already shared your review freely within the company and had active discussions. "We eat failure for breakfast" is a credo and we mean it. We plan to have more discussions. We believe that our ability to stand in uncomfortable situations with mindfulness, a focus on listening, and honesty, is how you build a great company. Again - Thanks for this opportunity to face into your issues. We're so sorry you were so unhappy for so long. It is not what we wish for you, or anyone, in any job - but especially at HubShout. Where to start? Oh my! Firstly, it is no surprise to us that you were unhappy. We knew of your disengagement from the tribe for quite some time. It was frequently discussed on the team as many of us were worried for you. Devin, Danielle, Tim and I had many conversations about how we could do better. Account Managers would mention it and help us brainstorm. We explored what we were doing wrong and how we could better reach out to you. Many attempts at dialog were made, but communication remained a challenge and our relationship suffered. Despite our efforts, you were clearly unhappy, and we do not feel good about that at all. I’m sure we could have done better / more. As for the state of our company culture, we are confused by your feedback. Since you left 3 months ago, we completed our 13th quarterly Culture Survey (we use a tool from the University of Southern California). After 3 years of hard work on culture, the score finally reached a new high, putting us in the top 20% of employers. The assessment tool is completed anonymously and we get a very high participation rate. The data suggests our culture is the strongest it has been in 11 years. On the issue of compensation, we agree with you on many points. We have done a poor job building career paths that lead to meaningful income opportunities in the company. We are actively trying to fix this issue. Last year, an employee-lead team completely overhauled the Account Manager position, resulting in 3 levels of promotion path and higher pay. They also revamped the bonus structure. They were given immense autonomy and came up with very creative solutions that made the company more efficient - money that they saw directly in record-level bonuses. We’re very proud of what the Account Managers did last year. We are also proud to have paid bonuses for 7 years straight. We benchmark our bonuses against other companies and they are significantly above average. This year we have launched a new position called Matrix Team Leader, again to create promotion and income opportunities. We are particularly focused on Danielle’s aspiration of “creating more leadership positions for women” in the firm. Andrea was recently promoted into this position and she is simply amazing. Finally, for the last several months Melissa has been leading an initiative specifically for a promotion path for Writers, the very issue you have raised. I have been personally involved with many of those meetings and support her mission. While we’re not finished with the work, our track record is strong and we will find a solution. We’re also confused on your points about turnover. Turnover was a major issue for the firm several years ago. As the culture has improved, it has become almost non-existent. Again - we review this data regularly and have open discussions. Turnover at HubShout for the last 24 months has been extraordinarily low. Again, I’m so sorry you missed out on all of these opportunities and the amazing culture we are building at HubShout. I am deeply saddened by your review, and the anger you have toward us. We want you to know that we are listening intently, with compassion. I sincerely wish you the best in your new job and thank you for your feedback.

  4. "Patience, Hard Work, and a Social Spirit Needed"

    4.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Content Writer 
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at HubShout full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Lots of social opportunities with a medium-size office full of friendly people. There are a few employees who don't participate in many social activities, but overall you'll enjoy the culture more if you get to know people. The workload is demanding, so procrastinators and slow writers beware. If you can handle the workload, the autonomy they give you is wonderful. Casual office as far as dress etc, but everyone is serious about building and improving a good company culture and a successful business. Genuinely enthusiastic and welcoming atmosphere. They promote internally whenever possible. Most people in management besides the heads of the company started out as entry-level content writers. Everyone is very willing to mentor you and help you forge skills and a career path.

    Cons

    Competitive pay and upward mobility are kind of limited right now since it's not a huge company. On the plus side, the company is developing specializations and micro-promotions, especially for content writers. Also, if you're mainly looking to pad your writing portfolio, this isn't necessarily the place for you. Since the company is white label, writers only get a byline for very select pieces and are essentially ghost writers for the majority of their work.

    HubShout Response

    October 29, 2018President

    Thank you very much for posting. We love feedback and believe that it allow us to grow stronger as a company. We are very glad our culture efforts are making the company experience more enjoyable... Thanks again!

  5. Helpful (2)

    "Premium Writer"

    3.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Premium Writer in Rochester, NY
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at HubShout full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    HubShout is a great place to launch a marketing career. It is a casual and engaging workplace, and management encourages collaboration at all levels. The company is team-oriented and employees truly do have an opportunity to have their voices heard. I made lasting connections at HubShout and admire my former coworkers for their drive. If you are at the beginning of your career and are looking for a place to learn about SEO and content writing, this may be the job for you. While working at HubShout, you do not need to worry about simply being a name on a screen. If they choose to do so, every employee can be part of the company culture and business development process. As for the Premium Writer position specifically, the job offers a lot of flexibility. After a certain amount of time at the company, writers can work remotely, allowing you to adapt to your own creative process. This was a huge perk of the job, and it allows you to save your PTO.

    Cons

    While HubShout overall can be an enjoyable place to work, especially for the young professional, the content writer job is difficult to sustain. Writers are required to complete a high volume of work in an unrealistic amount of time. Over time, this demand took a serious toll on my mental and physical health. While the management team was aware of this stress, there was no sense of urgency to change the writing quota or job structure. Rather, writers were encouraged to work on projects to make changes themselves -- only to find that this commitment cut into writing time. Overall, the relationship between management and the writers was strong, as the entire content team meets twice per week. However, the lines between horizontal and top-down leadership were often blurred. During the end of my time at HubShout, I noticed that many decisions were being made within the editorial and management team, rather than including the writers. This move away from horizontal structure played a role in my choice to leave the company. Though it is true that the Premium Writer position is an entry-level job, the low pay also became difficult to live on. Any applicants should be aware of this when considering the job.

    Continue reading

    HubShout Response

    March 5, 2018President

    Hi! And thanks so much for your thoughtful post. We are so glad that you made lasting connections here. We see that a ton, and are very proud that many are able to launch their careers from our little company. We are also really excited that our efforts at collaboration are being noticed. That's been a big initiative for us. Being inclusive is a priority, and we believe it has made us stronger. As you know, we are very values-driven. We view these opportunities for feedback as essential in our growth process. As a result, I will personally sit down with this feedback and review it with the team. Our culture has come a long way, and you have made awesome points that could help us propel farther. You are correct, we have very high expectations for output. We know that helping Main Street business achieve their dreams will not be easy, and we're up to the task. That being said, we are constantly searching for better ways to do it (and believe that there ARE better ways we have not discovered yet). Innovation is a core value and is still needed in the Writer position (as you point out). Again - Thanks so much for your feedback! And for contributing to the HubShouter Culture!

  6. Helpful (1)

    "Not a forever job, but not a bad first one"

    4.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Premium Writer 
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No Opinion of CEO

    I worked at HubShout full-time

    Pros

    HubShout was a good experience overall. I think the best approach is to treat it like a paid internship -- that’s about as long as a lot of writers stay anyway. It’s not going to be a forever employer but it’s not a bad intro to writing etc., and probably no other place will ever ask you to write so much in a day so you’ll be prepped. I would say the company has a fair # of things that could be improved on. To their credit they have definitely stepped up and delivered on a lot of things that were problems in the past. Some issues are communication issues that, while aggravating, are persistent in this type of business because there are so many layers by necessity (client, reseller, AM, writer, everyone in between who may forget to relay a message, etc). Most of the people I've known at HubShout who were interested in writing as a career and not just falling into it since it pays better than Wegmans, have gone on to genuinely awesome jobs, so in my opinion it can be worth it for you. You'll bond over weird work requirements. Truly it was a pleasure to come to work most days, because it felt like a big group of friends. You may not become an "SEO expert" as a writer but most of the world is so fresh to SEO that this is all you need to get a good toe-hold. Pro: work from home option. Def helps keep some people around a little longer.

    Cons

    One of the big points that made me realize there was an end time for my working there was the PTO. 12 days a year for sick/personal/doctors/vacation/*blizzards*(! I was mad to hear about friends having to drive in dangerous conditions when a work-from-home exception really should be granted... if something actually happened how horrible would that be??) is on the low side, especially when you have to accrue it and then ask permission for unpaid time. I usually worked from home when I was at my peak contagious moments; while it’s nice to have that option (really!!) it was still sometimes hard to work around. Last fall I got sick over and over which is not usual for me and I think it was because so many people in the office were coming in sick. Invest in a box of tissues if you work here ;) At some point I feel like everyone around me just started mentally checking out once they realized that there is a lot of talk about caring about your opinion, but in practice this doesn’t always/often happen. Which is okay, we’re in our mid-20s with little business management experience and a lot of people suggest the same things over and over that aren't feasible, without realizing it. But maybe try and be more realistic in the pep talks about what writers can contribute, and there won't be as much disillusionment down the road, which seems to be fairly consistent in feedback. I realize that on some level the writing can be done by a lot of people eager for a first/real job, and so the high turnover might not seem like that big of a deal. However, I would think clients are better served by having consistent writers who have worked with the company for longer than a hot second, and putting in a bit of effort or $ in retention now will pay off in the long run. I mean at some point there must be a cost to having completely new people being *constantly* thrown at clients, considering that blogs are something that, while only a small part of the puzzle, are very visible for clients to see/evaluate for quality. It also just has a snowball/demoralizing effect, where people quitting causes other people to quit. I never had as much issue as many people with the work requirements, but by the time I left they were getting a bit out there with the additional requests for what you had to do every week, even by my "I'm okay with cranking things out" standard. I'm not really sure what a solution to this would be since it seemed like keeping prices low was probably hinging on this. But hopefully things will eventually even out for people there.

    Continue reading
  7. Helpful (1)

    "Wasn't Right for Me, Might Be for Someone Else"

    4.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Premium Content Writer in Rochester, NY

    I worked at HubShout full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    The best thing about HubShout, hands down, is the people working there. They're smart and funny and weird in the best possible way. It's a casual office culture (no really, you can wear your sweatpants), which wasn't a particular draw for me, but might be for others. Management is also pretty good at listening to concerns, and I saw the working environment get about 10 times better just in the year that I was working there. Writers can also work from home under certain conditions, which was a major perk for me -- especially in winter! Leadership is also really open to you doing cool little side projects, which can break up the routine and allow you to use past experience or unique skill sets in a different context. I also have to give a shout-out to Adam, the president of the company, who I think handled a recent crisis extraordinarily well. When the writing team was completely overloaded, he was literally bringing us snacks to try to ease the burden. Not many company presidents would do that.

    Cons

    My job wasn't a bad job, it just wasn't a good fit for me. I didn't feel the writing quota was difficult to reach, but I found it really difficult to stay motivated because I just didn't like what I was doing. Coming from journalism, I felt that some of the tactics were a little sketchy; however, within the arena of content marketing, HubShout is pretty admirable and solidly in white-hat territory. The pay felt low to me because it was actually less than I was making prior to grad school, but it's not bad for entry level -- management is pretty up front about it being an entry-level job, and it's not their fault I took it despite being technically overqualified. I will say that there isn't much of a promotion track just because of the nature of the work, but I probably wouldn't have stayed much longer anyway because I wouldn't have been happy even with a better-paying job in online marketing. Due to my general unhappiness in the field, I let little frustrations get overwhelming, but I think they're the kind of little frustrations (inefficiency, miscommunication) that you'll have in any working environment. My leaving for another job is truly an it's-not-you-it's-me situation. I really hated this job and found it soul-crushing, but I guess that's not surprising since I took a job in a field that I didn't actually want to work in.

    Continue reading

    HubShout Response

    September 22, 2015President

    Hi there! Thanks so much for this detailed feedback. We greatly appreciate it and will be sharing it with our management team. Yeah - the recent backlog of work was very stressful, but I was so proud of how the team pulled together and took it on. Looking back now 90 days later, the team is so much stronger now. It was a real growing experience. The team-building opportunities are just too good to pass up. I don't think we will ever stop now that we've seen how strong we are when we work together. The special projects are also really awesome and I'm glad you were able to take part in those. We have such competitive pressure from our off-shore competitors, it is hard to weave these in - but we are committed to making HubShout a great place to work.. I know that variety and a growth path are critical. Thanks again for the feedback, as well as your service to HubShout! It is greatly appreciated.

  8. Helpful (3)

    "The Best Education Around"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    SEO Analyst/Social Media in Rochester, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at HubShout for more than a year

    Pros

    Education / Experience - I cannot stress this enough. You will be handling hundreds of accounts from small dentists to massive e-commerce sites and more. The pay for writers / seo / ppc analysts is enough to live off of (most of us were between 22-30ish years old) but after your time at Hubshout you will be able to make a huge difference in any field you go into because you have, quite literally, done it all. Get your hands dirty and learn some content writing, some ppc, cross train into some social. Hubshout lets you do it all-- if you want to. Take advantage of it! Career Opportunities / Senior Management - If you're not trying to build up a long-term future with the company, they'll have your back when you want to move on. Put in your time and then your 2 weeks and you can get a great (and powerful) recommendation from the President, the CEO and your direct manager. Even after I left Hubshout they were reaching out to me with updates and support. If you need anything, the managers' doors are almost always open, including the President's. Work Environment- Your work friends become your work family. I felt more attached to my co-workers at Hubshout than I did to many of my college friends when I graduated. Everyone's very much "in this together" and although sometimes that boils down to grumbling about a recent change as you walk to Tim Hortons (which is right across the street!) or about a particularly troublesome client, they always have your back-- be it at work or out for drinks after.

    Cons

    Limited Growth Opportunities - If you're going for an analyst / writer position, treat this as your masters degree. You will get some of the best experience working with hundred of different industries across the US and Canada. At a certain point, however, you realize that you're doing everything the Account Managers are doing and then some, or your fixing their mistakes without monetary recognition. Hubshout has been trying to work on this, however, and just created 2 new VP positions which could mean shifting into a less "flat" company. Workload Fluctuation - From next to nothing one day to drastically overbooked the next. If you speak to your manager about it they'll help out but it really depends on how much the resellers are selling. Be clear about how busy you are and don't let yourself drown. Limited Long-Term Engagement- This isn't really Hubshout's fault and is more the nature of being an SEO Reseller. You handle several hundred separate accounts, all widely varied which is a great thing for a resume / experience, but limits your engagement with the work that your doing. Nothing is more frustrating than working on a project for four hours, handing it over to a reseller and not seeing it again till they ask why their rankings aren't up 6 months later and the changes you suggested were never implemented.

  9. Helpful (7)

    "Cool Start Up"

    5.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Writer in Rochester, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at HubShout full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Super friendly place where everybody is cool. Office is a welcome change from the usual Rochester job. Fun and different. People actually care about the place. Great benefits for writers.

    Cons

    Every now and then a difficult employee is hired. But management is good about addressing issues when we bring them to them.

    Continue reading
  10. Helpful (1)

    "Not Bad if You Can Swing It."

    3.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Premium Writer - Freelance in Rochester, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at HubShout full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    As a freelance writer there is a ton of freedom. You are technically not an employee, so you can kind of come and go as you please, as long as you get the work done on time. The woman in charge of the writers at the Rochester branch is amazing. She clearly cares and makes the writers feel more appreciated and needed than anyone else there. It is a rapidly growing company, and I like working here and being a part of it. I just wish I could be more of a part of it.

    Cons

    The computer system the writers use is often kind of buggy. The assignments that you finish can just sit in a review queue for over a month, so you do not get paid regularly. Even though the writers are technically just contract work, it feels like we are just peons, even though we are creating the body of content provided to the clients. I have been here for three months, and have yet to get enough assignments to make it worth working here, even though I am constantly told that there are more than enough to go around.

    Continue reading

Choose a different language and keep reading other reviews.

Found 10 reviews