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Thoughtworks

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Thoughtworks

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Thoughtworks FAQ

Have questions about working at Thoughtworks? Read answers to frequently asked questions to help you make a choice before applying to a job or accepting a job offer.

Whether it's about compensation and benefits, culture and diversity, or you're curious to know more about the work environment, find out from employees what it's like to work at Thoughtworks.

All answers shown come directly from Thoughtworks Reviews and are not edited or altered.

63 English questions out of 63

8 February 2022

Does Thoughtworks offer massages?

Pros

There is free coffee in the office.

Cons

It took me 2 years of therapy to understand how I was being used. This company underpays and over works people. The company philosophy was once described to me by someone who was a senior leader as “the illusion of democracy”. The recruiting organization is very misguided and has poor leadership.

There is free coffee in the office.

8 February 2022

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29 November 2021

Does Thoughtworks offer dental insurance?

Pros

Organisation is transparent and very open about the roles and responsibilities of employee. Each and everyday you learn something new either it may be technical or communication with clients but you will be learning new things Very good and constructive feedback will be given to you and it tends to improve your ability and become more productive and useful We are open to try new things in our project and organisation. Very good benefits including allowances for food , internet and mobile and also medical and personal insurance

Cons

Given the quantum of work that we do I feel that we are less paid compared to our competitors and it tends to lose some very good people from the company.

Advice to Management

Be on par or ahead of the competitors with the pay

Very good benefits including allowances for food , internet and mobile and also medical and personal insurance

29 November 2021

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21 September 2020

Does Thoughtworks have a pension plan?

Pros

- Amazing culture of diversity, inclusivity and equality/equity, you can be yourself, dress the way you want - Amazing people, you'll make tons of friends and massively increase your professional network - Amazing technical reputation and branding within the industry, having TW on your CV makes an impression in the industry, people will constantly ask you about what it was like to work for ThoughtWorks and you'll have instant credibility in technical roles. You'll have lots of solid experience in software delivery, and very transferrable consulting skills. - Highly recommend for graduates to get started with a solid technical foundation for their next industry job, or for people to get ThoughtWorks on their CV - First two years are amazing due to all of the above, you'll make lots of friends, have opportunities to try public speaking, build your personal brand, etc. - Strong benefits, life insurance, critical illness insurance, health insurance, 6 months maternity leave, cycle to work scheme, £800 health fund for certain things, 6% pension, etc.

Cons

- Astonishingly low salaries unless you come in as an external hire, but even then - Astonishingly low annual pay increases (either 1% , 3% or 5% based on performance), then they gaslight you into thinking that 5% is really really really good when that's what you would normally get for average performance outside in the industry. - "Loyalty" tax, home grown graduates get screwed because they'll start at 35-40k, but are only given 3% salary increases, so by the time you have 5 years experience, your pay will only be 46-47k. Outside of TW, someone with 5 years experience would be getting 70k+. If you hand in your notice, then they will offer you a raise, but you shouldn't have to threaten to quit to be compensated fairly. - You are only valued if you are cheap enough for them to make money off billing you out for £1000/day. As soon as you ask for a pay increase, your value to TW starts to diminish because it means they can make less money off you, this is regardless of your performance, your brand, your network or how good you are. The only way to mitigate this is to get promoted because they'd be able to bill you for more money. TW projects are basically tech sweatshops. - Being trapped because of diversity and inclusion, people are made to believe it's so horrible outside of TW, and so they're afraid to look or consider elsewhere and will accept the low pay. - Boring client projects, majority of TW client work is the same, some legacy system with massive cultural and quality issues, inability to move forward due to technical debt and all the best people quit leaving the worst people behind. The clients who are able to afford TW are all the same, very established, older players who have not been able to keep up technologically. Any project you're on will have a really boring, dull domain with really crap tech, and client people who are probably incompetent and resistant to change, and you'll be dealing with lots of politics ("creating influence") and solving the problems using the same TW playbook. You'll come out with a lot of experience dealing with legacy systems, and very strong software development practices (TDD, CI/CD, XP), but it won't teach you anything about solving actually interesting greenfield technical problems. While you can definitely get an interview, you won't have the deep technical experience required to get into FAANG or any prestigious software developer role unless you already have previous experience, a background in computer science or go out of your way to do it yourself with personal projects. - Networking usually required to get on good projects, what few good projects there are within TW, they will usually go to the consultants that have the strongest internal network (aka friends in high places). It is not uncommon for the most popular consultants to get put together on the best projects, and not uncommon for people to be accepted into projects because they've worked with someone on that team before. This is not a bad thing, but if you are not the type who likes to go out there and make friends, you are likely to be stuck on crap projects in crap locations. - Even with a strong D&I focus, you'll still experience microaggressions because not everyone in TW is fully bought into D&I, especially with the decrease in investment in this area. Additionally, the "women" numbers come from 50%+ diverse graduates, but lots of women end up quitting as they get more experience, so there's still very few tech females in the upper ranks - Average turnover of 3 years, by the time you hit 2 years at TW you'll start seeing people you know personally quit, and these will be people you hold in high esteem and it will make you think about quitting also. People with 3+ years TW tenure tend to be very jaded about the company - No clear career paths for non-technical roles. If you are not a developer at TW, you won't get the same amount of training, support or role clarity. BAs and QAs are frequently roped into doing delivery management. - Politics involved in promotions, there's a limited number of promotions available every cycle, so whether you get promoted depends on who else is asking for a promotion and whether they have a stronger case/support/backing than you.

Strong benefits, life insurance, critical illness insurance, health insurance, 6 months maternity leave, cycle to work scheme, £800 health fund for certain things, 6% pension, etc.

21 September 2020

See answer

31 August 2022

Does Thoughtworks offer a wellness program?

Pros

Thoughtworks is a very special place to work. From the day you join, the unique culture and lived values are evident. Flat organisation structure, so no 'boss' - high performance shines through from team success and the impact you have working with others. Great benefits, including reimbursement to study, for technology and books, and for your general health and wellbeing.

Cons

Compensation isn't quite as high as other consultancies - but personally the culture and other benefits more than make up for this.

Great benefits, including reimbursement to study, for technology and books, and for your general health and wellbeing.

31 August 2022

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21 September 2020

Does Thoughtworks offer life insurance?

Pros

- Amazing culture of diversity, inclusivity and equality/equity, you can be yourself, dress the way you want - Amazing people, you'll make tons of friends and massively increase your professional network - Amazing technical reputation and branding within the industry, having TW on your CV makes an impression in the industry, people will constantly ask you about what it was like to work for ThoughtWorks and you'll have instant credibility in technical roles. You'll have lots of solid experience in software delivery, and very transferrable consulting skills. - Highly recommend for graduates to get started with a solid technical foundation for their next industry job, or for people to get ThoughtWorks on their CV - First two years are amazing due to all of the above, you'll make lots of friends, have opportunities to try public speaking, build your personal brand, etc. - Strong benefits, life insurance, critical illness insurance, health insurance, 6 months maternity leave, cycle to work scheme, £800 health fund for certain things, 6% pension, etc.

Cons

- Astonishingly low salaries unless you come in as an external hire, but even then - Astonishingly low annual pay increases (either 1% , 3% or 5% based on performance), then they gaslight you into thinking that 5% is really really really good when that's what you would normally get for average performance outside in the industry. - "Loyalty" tax, home grown graduates get screwed because they'll start at 35-40k, but are only given 3% salary increases, so by the time you have 5 years experience, your pay will only be 46-47k. Outside of TW, someone with 5 years experience would be getting 70k+. If you hand in your notice, then they will offer you a raise, but you shouldn't have to threaten to quit to be compensated fairly. - You are only valued if you are cheap enough for them to make money off billing you out for £1000/day. As soon as you ask for a pay increase, your value to TW starts to diminish because it means they can make less money off you, this is regardless of your performance, your brand, your network or how good you are. The only way to mitigate this is to get promoted because they'd be able to bill you for more money. TW projects are basically tech sweatshops. - Being trapped because of diversity and inclusion, people are made to believe it's so horrible outside of TW, and so they're afraid to look or consider elsewhere and will accept the low pay. - Boring client projects, majority of TW client work is the same, some legacy system with massive cultural and quality issues, inability to move forward due to technical debt and all the best people quit leaving the worst people behind. The clients who are able to afford TW are all the same, very established, older players who have not been able to keep up technologically. Any project you're on will have a really boring, dull domain with really crap tech, and client people who are probably incompetent and resistant to change, and you'll be dealing with lots of politics ("creating influence") and solving the problems using the same TW playbook. You'll come out with a lot of experience dealing with legacy systems, and very strong software development practices (TDD, CI/CD, XP), but it won't teach you anything about solving actually interesting greenfield technical problems. While you can definitely get an interview, you won't have the deep technical experience required to get into FAANG or any prestigious software developer role unless you already have previous experience, a background in computer science or go out of your way to do it yourself with personal projects. - Networking usually required to get on good projects, what few good projects there are within TW, they will usually go to the consultants that have the strongest internal network (aka friends in high places). It is not uncommon for the most popular consultants to get put together on the best projects, and not uncommon for people to be accepted into projects because they've worked with someone on that team before. This is not a bad thing, but if you are not the type who likes to go out there and make friends, you are likely to be stuck on crap projects in crap locations. - Even with a strong D&I focus, you'll still experience microaggressions because not everyone in TW is fully bought into D&I, especially with the decrease in investment in this area. Additionally, the "women" numbers come from 50%+ diverse graduates, but lots of women end up quitting as they get more experience, so there's still very few tech females in the upper ranks - Average turnover of 3 years, by the time you hit 2 years at TW you'll start seeing people you know personally quit, and these will be people you hold in high esteem and it will make you think about quitting also. People with 3+ years TW tenure tend to be very jaded about the company - No clear career paths for non-technical roles. If you are not a developer at TW, you won't get the same amount of training, support or role clarity. BAs and QAs are frequently roped into doing delivery management. - Politics involved in promotions, there's a limited number of promotions available every cycle, so whether you get promoted depends on who else is asking for a promotion and whether they have a stronger case/support/backing than you.

Strong benefits, life insurance, critical illness insurance, health insurance, 6 months maternity leave, cycle to work scheme, £800 health fund for certain things, 6% pension, etc.

21 September 2020

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63 English questions out of 63

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Thoughtworks

135 days ago

We're proud to be GPTW certified in 12 countries around the world! Our people are what make Thoughtworks special and thanks to their feedback we continue to make it an even more extraordinary place to work.  #GreatPlaceToWork #ExtraordinaryImpact
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