Thoughtworks FAQ

Have questions about working at Thoughtworks? Read answers to frequently asked questions to help you make a choice before applying to a job or accepting a job offer.

Whether it's about compensation and benefits, culture and diversity, or you're curious to know more about the work environment, find out from employees what it's like to work at Thoughtworks.

All answers shown come directly from Thoughtworks Reviews and are not edited or altered.

61 English questions out of 61

16 May 2019

Does Thoughtworks offer relocation assistance?

Pros

- Company culture of socialising, collaboration and support - Being given true responsibility within your projects or departments - Flat hierarchy and transparency- giving everyone the opportunity to add input or to challenge decisions - Benefits package, and day to day benefits - Strong social justice and community building focus - Lack of petty corporate rules, allowing focus on things that matter

Cons

- Being a consultancy the team is spread across numerous locations

Advice to Management

Keep up the culture and unique corporate style as we continue to grow

Benefits package, and day to day benefits

16 May 2019

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14 August 2021

Does Thoughtworks offer massages?

Pros

* If you get a project for more than 6 months you will get good knowledge and will make a good impact * Opportunities to learn * You can have good networking with people * Friday free lunch (If someone counts it as a benefit) * TW maintains diversity in hiring, so they just hire people to maintain a record

Cons

Yes, the company has lots of diversity in terms of people and technology. * Small one-floor office where you have to find a place to work. * Only a few leaders/engineers are technically good, others just fake themself. * You will be thrown into a project without having an understanding of your background and technical skills * To be in a project you have to make "organic" networking with people. So if you have good networking you will get a project. * Person who does the project assignment in TW does not know anything about the depth of technical projects, they just assign the projects by reading the keywords in your updated resume. You have to unnecessarily talk to those people so they assign projects to you * If you do not earn for them then you will be on the beach(doing nothing) and this is a red flag 🚩 and constantly you have to discuss and have to talk to people which is hard if you are an introvert. * If you are not in a project you have to help in office management, like keeping fruits on the table, decoration help, kitchen cleaning. * Project can be very short and long. If you are on a short project then you will have a lot of pressure on performance. * They accept all types of projects to make good visibility on the market * Interviews process is not very clean, as I said they just hire to maintain the diversity * Force to take paid leave during covid * Oh yes!!. They also maintain your working hours Currently, I am very disturbed and visiting the doctor for anxiety issues. I never felt this much unwelcomed ever before.

Friday free lunch (If someone counts it as a benefit)

14 August 2021

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26 March 2021

Does Thoughtworks offer parental leave?

Pros

You'll work with some of the smartest people in the technology industry You are treated like a human, trusted and respected You are always made to feel welcome The work is interesting - clients challenge us with complexed problems which keeps us on our toes and in turn makes the work challenging and enjoyable The benefits aren't spoken about enough, length pat leave, 6 months full pay, or 12 months half pay maternity alongside an incredible new fertility policy to support IVF treatment and child loss

Cons

Training has been a problem in the past, but in the past 6 months there has been some great initiatives put into place for folk to really learn and advance their own expertise

Advice to Management

Keep listening, keep evolving, keep being honest and open

The benefits aren't spoken about enough, length pat leave, 6 months full pay, or 12 months half pay maternity alongside an incredible new fertility policy to support IVF treatment and child loss

26 March 2021

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21 September 2020

Does Thoughtworks have a pension plan?

Pros

- Amazing culture of diversity, inclusivity and equality/equity, you can be yourself, dress the way you want - Amazing people, you'll make tons of friends and massively increase your professional network - Amazing technical reputation and branding within the industry, having TW on your CV makes an impression in the industry, people will constantly ask you about what it was like to work for ThoughtWorks and you'll have instant credibility in technical roles. You'll have lots of solid experience in software delivery, and very transferrable consulting skills. - Highly recommend for graduates to get started with a solid technical foundation for their next industry job, or for people to get ThoughtWorks on their CV - First two years are amazing due to all of the above, you'll make lots of friends, have opportunities to try public speaking, build your personal brand, etc. - Strong benefits, life insurance, critical illness insurance, health insurance, 6 months maternity leave, cycle to work scheme, £800 health fund for certain things, 6% pension, etc.

Cons

- Astonishingly low salaries unless you come in as an external hire, but even then - Astonishingly low annual pay increases (either 1% , 3% or 5% based on performance), then they gaslight you into thinking that 5% is really really really good when that's what you would normally get for average performance outside in the industry. - "Loyalty" tax, home grown graduates get screwed because they'll start at 35-40k, but are only given 3% salary increases, so by the time you have 5 years experience, your pay will only be 46-47k. Outside of TW, someone with 5 years experience would be getting 70k+. If you hand in your notice, then they will offer you a raise, but you shouldn't have to threaten to quit to be compensated fairly. - You are only valued if you are cheap enough for them to make money off billing you out for £1000/day. As soon as you ask for a pay increase, your value to TW starts to diminish because it means they can make less money off you, this is regardless of your performance, your brand, your network or how good you are. The only way to mitigate this is to get promoted because they'd be able to bill you for more money. TW projects are basically tech sweatshops. - Being trapped because of diversity and inclusion, people are made to believe it's so horrible outside of TW, and so they're afraid to look or consider elsewhere and will accept the low pay. - Boring client projects, majority of TW client work is the same, some legacy system with massive cultural and quality issues, inability to move forward due to technical debt and all the best people quit leaving the worst people behind. The clients who are able to afford TW are all the same, very established, older players who have not been able to keep up technologically. Any project you're on will have a really boring, dull domain with really crap tech, and client people who are probably incompetent and resistant to change, and you'll be dealing with lots of politics ("creating influence") and solving the problems using the same TW playbook. You'll come out with a lot of experience dealing with legacy systems, and very strong software development practices (TDD, CI/CD, XP), but it won't teach you anything about solving actually interesting greenfield technical problems. While you can definitely get an interview, you won't have the deep technical experience required to get into FAANG or any prestigious software developer role unless you already have previous experience, a background in computer science or go out of your way to do it yourself with personal projects. - Networking usually required to get on good projects, what few good projects there are within TW, they will usually go to the consultants that have the strongest internal network (aka friends in high places). It is not uncommon for the most popular consultants to get put together on the best projects, and not uncommon for people to be accepted into projects because they've worked with someone on that team before. This is not a bad thing, but if you are not the type who likes to go out there and make friends, you are likely to be stuck on crap projects in crap locations. - Even with a strong D&I focus, you'll still experience microaggressions because not everyone in TW is fully bought into D&I, especially with the decrease in investment in this area. Additionally, the "women" numbers come from 50%+ diverse graduates, but lots of women end up quitting as they get more experience, so there's still very few tech females in the upper ranks - Average turnover of 3 years, by the time you hit 2 years at TW you'll start seeing people you know personally quit, and these will be people you hold in high esteem and it will make you think about quitting also. People with 3+ years TW tenure tend to be very jaded about the company - No clear career paths for non-technical roles. If you are not a developer at TW, you won't get the same amount of training, support or role clarity. BAs and QAs are frequently roped into doing delivery management. - Politics involved in promotions, there's a limited number of promotions available every cycle, so whether you get promoted depends on who else is asking for a promotion and whether they have a stronger case/support/backing than you.

Strong benefits, life insurance, critical illness insurance, health insurance, 6 months maternity leave, cycle to work scheme, £800 health fund for certain things, 6% pension, etc.

21 September 2020

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16 August 2021

Does Thoughtworks offer a wellness program?

Pros

- good training opportunities, benefits, wellness allowance. Get the opportunity to work on complex projects with a lot of scope.

Cons

- career development can be quite hard if you aren't good at self promoting. Most consultants don't have an option on what work they can do

good training opportunities, benefits, wellness allowance.

16 August 2021

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61 English questions out of 61

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