HubShout Reviews | Glassdoor.co.in

HubShout Reviews

Updated Oct 11, 2019

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Found 66 reviews

3.4
StarStarStarStarStar
Rating TrendsRating Trends
62%
Recommend to a Friend
72%
Approve of CEO
HubShout CEO Chad Hill (no image)
Chad Hill
45 Ratings
Pros
  • "The content team leaders do a good job of letting writers know that they’re there to provide support whenever and however they can(in 9 reviews)

  • "Great work environment and people(in 8 reviews)

Cons
  • "Not only were writers expected to meet quota every week, but there became a heavier focus on(in 18 reviews)

  • "Though it is true that the Premium Writer position is an entry-level job, the low pay also became difficult to live on(in 9 reviews)

More Pros and Cons
  1. "HubShout Is a High Culture Workplace"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Account Manager in Rochester, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at HubShout full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    One of the company's top priorities is building a world-class, people-first culture. Its environment is highly collaborative. And its managers invest heavily into the development of their teams.

    Cons

    We don't have an abundance of time off.

    Advice to Management

    Continue to care personally and challenge directly!

    HubShout2019-10-11
  2. Helpful (1)

    "A company that helps you grow!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Marketing and Team Development 
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at HubShout part-time

    Pros

    In December 2014, I started working at HubShout as a New Business Development Rep. I had been unemployed by a corporate like business for several years, recently had a baby, recently moved out of my parents' basement and in with my at the time boyfriend. This was a job I desperately needed and HubShout took a chance on me. I met the President at the company upon starting and remember thinking how awesome it was... that I got to shake his hand and that this type of introduction was not was I was accustomed to when I had worked for another marketing job several years prior. Rarely were these people in these positions available for face to face meetings, just people you either heard about or read about. After about a week of training, I was set to go. My background at the time was in advertising, specifically in print, online, and mobile. I had not done much with SEO, but was excited to learn. This was a different beast. Early on in my career at HubShout there were individuals who shared their frustrations about their own experiences. I needed this job and wanted to learn so I did my best to not let it distract me, after all, I had a family to support. Within a month I was promoted to an Account Manager. There wasn’t as much training in this role as there was when I started, but I was OK with asking team members questions to help me acclimate and adapt. I began to experience what people had been sharing with me earlier about their frustrations. So I made a decision to investigate and found that there was a serious lack of communication between departments and quickly realized that in order for me to be successful in my position and to help our clients be successful, these walls had to be torn down. I approached the Leadership Team at HubShout and shared what I had been hearing. I asked for permission to gather people from different departments to discuss our differences and challenges so we could find a way to work better together. This was the start of cross department collaboration, and I found fulfillment in learning about each individual who worked there and their roles. I found fulfillment in learning how we could break down walls and build bridges within the HubShout community. I was met with some opposition, which can be expected when people are asked to step out of their comfort zone, but ultimately, it started a culture shift towards what I believe stronger relationships and overall better business. I was hungry for more and began participating in activities like book clubs, leadership meetings, fun committee meetings, and continued to work at bridging gaps where there was a need. I learned about the differences between management and leadership, intrinsic vs extrinsic motivation, self awareness, how to adapt the way I speak to others who may or may not be in the same place metaphorically speaking as myself, different ways to work through difficult situations and difficult people, and so much more. The Leadership team believed in me and I did not take that for granted. Some time had passed, and I felt a calling to serve in other areas of my life. I decided to put in a letter of resignation, only to be called in and asked, “what can we do to keep you here?”. I was offered a part time position so I could continue my work there and do other things life had called me to do. HubShout believed in me, and proved it again. Through this experience, I learned more about maximizing my input to increase output. I learned more about time management and had set a goal for myself to have a greater impact in the less time I spent there. After some time, all this effort led me to an opportunity to create a position that never existed before. I became the Marketing and Team Development Leader. This required a lot more responsibility but I was for it because I knew that the time and autonomy HubShout invested and provided me had equipped me for a role such as this. Things began changing at what felt like an eternity but in fact was really quick in the big picture. The culture around me was changing, the people were changing, attitudes and perceptions were changing, and it was good. HubShout worked hard at recognizing my strengths while working with me to find areas where I could grow. They made sure to put me and the needs of my family first, recognizing that I was a young mom. Fun fact, I got married on a Tuesday, and worked that Tuesday. The fun part about working this day was that as soon as they found out I was getting married, which was the day of, the Leadership Team gathered the company into a meeting room, brought me in and surprised me with a celebration. They took the time to recognize I was a person first, not just an employee. In December 2016 I had another calling to serve outside of HubShout and decided it was at this time I had to move on. Fast forward three years. Every day I use the tools I was equipped with at HubShout. One of the books we read was Search Inside Yourself by Chade-Meng Tan and an exercise we did during book club was to take 8 minutes and write out where we as individuals would be in five years. I have that piece of paper in my dresser and often look at it, reflecting on where I was and where I am at now. Most of it has come to fruition, I’ve done missionary work in Africa since then, had my second child, restructured and grew an online business that allowed for flexibility to spend quality time with my family, and now working towards a growing partnership in a Main Street business (well really it’s an East Avenue business) whose mission is to build and share childlike faith, joy and wonder with the world while standing firm in our core values of fun, creativity, community, and safety. I have taken every experience, good and challenging, and have applied it to my everyday life. To this day, I am still working with the team at HubShout. I am still learning from the experiences they have shared with me while being outside of their home. I find it incredible that the individuals who are still there are still pouring into my career and my soul even after not being employed there for several years. I am so grateful for this company who took a chance on me five years ago, and still continues to believe in the person I am and the person I am becoming. Thank you HubShout for all you do to serve.

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    Cons

    None off the top of my head

    HubShout2019-10-01
  3. "A Seriously Great Place To Work"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Operations Manager in Rochester, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at HubShout full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    There are several "pros" for working here. First off is the people. There is an incredible culture that gives every last person the support they need to be successful. There is no ego, competition, or jealousy on the team. Everyone truly goes out of their way to make sure every last team member is as successful as they want to be. With the frequent pivots that need to take place in the digital marketing space,... not to mention last-minute emergencies that need to be tended to, that support is invaluable. There is also ample opportunity to shape the direction of the company. Decisions and innovation are not top down. Rather it's the team that has come up with game changing strategies and products. The next big idea can come from anybody and systems are set up to ensure those ideas are heard. Hubshout is plugged into Rochester's legacy of innovation. The commitment to growing the workforce in order to provide more financial and professional opportunities in Rochester is commendable. If you want to help bring Rochester back, this is the place to be.

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    Cons

    With the ever-changing nature of digital marketing, a certain level of flexibility and innovation is required. I would not begrudge someone for not looking for uncertainty in their career. For those who are looking for constant challenges and ways to reshape an organization from the ground up, this is the place. The work is not necessarily predictable and that needs to be known for any potential candidate. It... can also take some time to see a monetary reward. However, if you are interested in tackling the company's challenges head-on, that reward will come.

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    HubShout2019-10-01
  4. Helpful (1)

    "Premium Writer Position at HubShout"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Premium Writer 

    I worked at HubShout full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    HubShout was my first place of employment out of college and it’s certainly an experience I will never forget. The company offers a casual and collaborative work environment and members from different teams have opportunities to work together on various problems and projects. There is a huge focus on building a strong team and overall culture, which I really loved. There are happy hours and company events, which... added to the fun environment of the office. The people I got to work with were my favorite part of the job. I built great friendships within the company and everyone was always friendly to each other. Especially within the content team, I felt as though I was part of a family. The content team leaders do a good job of letting writers know that they’re there to provide support whenever and however they can. Writers do have the opportunity to work from home after a few months, which was a major benefit of the job. Without this ability, I don’t think I would have stayed as long as I did. I learned so much from this job -- from the basics of SEO to how to be a better leader. HubShout was a great place to learn the basics of digital marketing and enter the professional world.

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    Cons

    Unfortunately, a ping-pong table and happy hours weren’t enough to make me want to stay at HubShout. For being an entry-level position, the premium writer role has a very heavy workload. Over time, this workload became immensely difficult to sustain. And despite writers being very open with management regarding the stress associated with the workload, no efforts were made to change this -- in fact, writers were... encouraged to try to find ways to reduce the quota themselves, which ultimately increased stress. Furthermore, writers were consistently encouraged to exceed quota, which added unnecessary pressure. Not only were writers expected to meet quota every week, but there became a heavier focus on writers participating in innovation and projects outside of writing, which was initially not part of the job description -- while it was always encouraged, it became clear that innovation was now an expectation that ultimately impacted the yearly bonus and overall job performance reviews. This expectation, again, increased stress, as writers had to take away time from writing to participate in various projects. The pay for the Premium Writer position is far below average for this type of work. While employees are eligible for a hefty bonus at the end of the year, if they meet the company's expectations, this does not make up for the low wages throughout the year. As the company grows, I hope writers are compensated more fairly for their work. Additionally, there is not much room for growth from the writer position. While there were internal promotions during my time with the company, they were few and far between.

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    Advice to Management

    Overall, my experience with HubShout was positive. However, during my almost two years with HubShout, both the company and my job changed -- which is to be expected over time, but I found that I was no longer a good fit for the position and vice versa. If/when management does decide to hire more writers, they should consider changing the job description to better fit the additional responsibilities writers have been... asked to take on. And, of course, writers should be better compensated for taking on these additional responsibilities outside of writing. The more time I spent at HubShout, the more I noticed a divide between the writers and the rest of the company -- I always felt less valued and appreciated than other employees. I highly encourage management to make sure their writers feel valued. Unfortunately, I left this job feeling much less valued than I did when I started. Please remember that your writers are humans, not just part of a content machine. After all, without writers, there is no HubShout.

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    HubShout2019-08-26

    HubShout Response

    August 27, 2019President

    Hi! Thanks so much for posting. We feel so much gratitude for the hard work you put in at the company and can't thank you enough for both your long tenure and sharing this feedback. This is a great perspective. We completely agree with you. We have a serious problem with the workload as it is currently constructed for writers. As you mentioned, we have been openly discussing this as a team for a while. The team is hard at work, considering some radically different ways for content production. There are several experiments running as I type that could completely change the structure of our jobs. It is our hope that this innovation will address the issues you raise. Thanks also for your kind words about our inclusivity and culture. That is a central focus for us. Our close ties and "family feel" is why we have been so successful for so long. Thanks again for your feedback!

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  5. "If You're New To The Workforce, Think Again Before Working Here."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Premium Writer in Rochester, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at HubShout full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    The people at HubShout are its biggest strength. Individuals are not afraid to step in and help other departments on a whim. Everyone is kind, courteous, and fun. If you need to kickstart your portfolio, this place can offer much needed experience in the field of digital marketing. Although there are weaknesses with the company culture, they do make a concerted effort to keep company activities fun and... frequent, which makes the company a refreshing place to work at times.

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    Cons

    HubShout will squeeze you dry in terms of output, and the ratio of output to compensation is far outweighed. Starting hourly wages are far below the industry standard for 2019. $12/hr is not a fair amount to be paid for the amount of work you will be expected to complete. Now, I've heard management say time and time again that they do have rigorous expectations and that you will reap the reward for your persistence... and determination for "success", but the truth is that I didn't see that actualized for the majority of hard workers I saw at HS in my time there. I'm not suggesting that there were absolutely no promotions, but they were few and far between. I've been told testimonies from multiple other former employees that even with a promotion, the wage increases were marginal (we're talking $0.25 or $0.50). This sort of wage bump is insignificant and disproportionate to the amount of work that is expected out of people given a promotion. The natural course that the above situation warrants is a high rate of employee turnover. When I started at HubShout, there were roughly 32-33 full time employees at any one time. Leading up to my departure from the company, I did a little reflecting of every person who had left in the window of time I was there and I learned that a resounding 30 people left the company and were replaced, most of them being writers, and some being Account Managers, and pretty much the entire Pay Per Click department. Even the CEO stepped down because he was discouraged with where the company was going. That's roughly 92% of the company replaced in a window of two years. That is not normal for companies in this industry. I know this now that I'm with a different company and from basically every other opinion I've heard outside of HS. Now, I was told that employee turnover was at an all-time low for the company in my time of working there. Ok, but even if that were true, it's still abhorrently high by comparison and it's clear why it is happening. People aren't getting paid enough, and they're being pressed for every ounce of work possible, with nothing to show for it but...pizza parties. I honestly believe there are other better alternatives for experience other than HS. Don't let your sense of self-value (monetarily speaking) be diminished by settling for the minimal amount of pay offered at this company.

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    Advice to Management

    Own up to the reality that the model you have chosen cannot support higher compensation and either change the model, or change your pricing. Right now, the people who are suffering for it are your own workers, and until it is fixed, every new writer that starts with HS will end up the same way; allured by the sense of good culture and a promising career, but will come to find out that they can't pay their bills in... the several years it takes to reach said success. By the way, The CEO is no longer Chad Hill, according to the website on the "Meet the Team" page. I would suggest adjusting that here.

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    HubShout2019-09-18

    HubShout Response

    September 23, 2019President

    Hello! Thank you so much for the feedback! One reason our culture has become so strong (we measure it quarterly using industry-leading instruments) is because we welcome all dissenting opinions and listen deeply to feedback - even when it is very hard to hear. Our team read your review and had an amazingly open discussion about it this morning in our Monday Leadership meeting. You are correct on so many points! I am the new CEO (we have some updating to do, clearly). And as such, I take full accountability. I am very sorry your experience was poor with us. I know we can do better. “Own up to the reality that the model you have chosen cannot support higher compensation and either change the model, or change your pricing” - Another great point. This is also correct. In fact, since January (shortly after I took over as CEO), the team has changed the model (they are so amazingly creative and focused) for both the old Writer and PPC Analyst positions. This has opened up new promotion opportunities with higher pay. 2 new promotions were decided just last week (before your post). We plan to do more in the first quarter of 2020. Interesting, we only have 3 writers left in the legacy position you experienced and no PPC Analysts (as we used to do it). Allie and I have been meeting regularly with the remaining 3 people to ensure their voices are heard and issues are being addressed while we finish the transition to a stronger model. WIth our new model, turnover has been low, culture has been higher, and customer satisfaction has been higher. Again - Your feedback was right on!

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  6. Helpful (11)

    "Incredibly overworked and severely underpaid - what writer life at HubShout is like."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Content Writer in Rochester, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at HubShout full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    The writers and account managers are very friendly, and it was a pleasure getting to know them. However, the only reason I (and probably other writers) continue(d) to stick around is because of the flexibility of being able to work from home. Working remotely and being able to build up a small portfolio (I do mean small - 99% of the work is ghostwriting) are literally the only redeeming qualities of this job.... Don't stick around for longer than you absolutely HAVE to - this company does NOT deserve your hard work.

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    Cons

    In all honesty, this job took away my passion for my craft and my confidence in myself. Here's why: Once you prove to management that you're a competent writer who can handle deadlines, they'll work you as hard as they possibly can by asking you to take on extra duties without any type of additional compensation, quota reduction, or even acknowledgement. You're expected to complete 45 articles ('tasks') per week,... with about 400 words per article (They told us that's one article every 48 minutes. Are we robots?). Sure, some of the featured news can be grouped together and written as one longer article, but you're writing an absolute minimum of 40 articles per week. That doesn't even include extra duties, like calls with clients, attending meetings, posting articles on Wordpress, making agendas for meetings, gathering topics and arranging editorial calendars...and the list goes on. Raises are virtually unheard of here. Instead, they give out 'bonuses' at the end of the year based on what's essentially an arbitrary rating of performance. Both years I was there, I was robbed of my bonus by a mere few hundredths of a point after being told repeatedly that I was 'on track' to receive a good bonus that year and hitting goal virtually every single week I worked there (exceeding goal many weeks as well). How's that for a blow to morale? Even the very nature of some of the work here seems questionable. For example, when we're on the phone with clients, we're typically supposed to avoid any mention of the word 'HubShout' due to the white-label nature of the business. Essentially, we're lying to our customers and making them think we're working for the reseller's company - the other agency involved in the transaction. It's a complicated mess. If the people paying for these services actually knew the mindset and amount of knowledge the writers have of most of the subjects they write about, they'd probably take their business elsewhere. Writers have to deal with some of the most complicated and technical subjects for incredibly niche industries that it's impossible to learn enough to write an article with a quick Google search. That, in and of itself, makes the job inherently unsustainable. To add insult to injury, the 'culture' (I use the word loosely because I never felt any sense of it) is greatly diminished by the very nature of the writers' jobs. Any time a 'fun' workplace event is scheduled, most writers are unable to attend because we have too much work - there was never a quota reduction offered, and if we went, we'd end up missing goal and getting greatly penalized. Any time writers asked about a quota reduction, they'd get told "I don't know - let me ask and get back to you" without ever hearing back. Seriously, what's the point of going to a "fun" event during work hours if you just have to rush even more later in the week to make up for it? As far as I know, no other employees had this issue other than the writers. All the Bob Ross painting events in the world can't make up for the absolutely atrocious way this company treats their writers. We were brushed under the rug and dismissed with each and every one of our concerns, without fail. Even the editors, who started as writers and should've understood our struggle, didn't hear out our concerns or advocate for our wellbeing in any real way, which is incredibly disappointing, to say the least. Instead, they just point out tiny ways you can still improve (even though you're taking on a heavier workload without a higher pay) and tell you to "manage your time better" or "work harder," frowning upon anyone who asks for any type of help or quota reduction (yes, I literally got penalized for this, even though I only needed that help because of all the extra work I was taking on). They never cease to focus on the small things you're doing wrong over the countless things you're doing RIGHT. It was only after I spent two years here and had been taking on an abundance of extra tasks that I perpetually started to fall behind because asking for help was seen as a sign of weakness. I finally drew the line and flat-out quit when the extra tasks I was taking on as a senior writer became far too much to handle - especially at the poverty wage level of $12.20/hr. I could walk into almost any grocery store or fast food restaurant, fresh out of high school, without a degree and make more than that per hour. Anyone with a heart or even an ounce of decency in their soul knows that those rates are flat-out extortion with this type and level of workload. This company doesn't deserve to be successful while taking such cruel advantage of younger workers just trying to get their foot in the door. (And yes, they do aim to hire younger workers, presumably so they can drastically underpay them - I recall there being an initiative to make HubShout the "best place to work for recent grads.") I could go on and on about the injustices witnessed during my time at HubShout; this is just the beginning. Fortunately, I was able to easily find a drastically better remote job that pays twice the salary of HubShout, and other writers surely can, too. I'm sure the CEO will formulate some articulate response to this review in an attempt to smooth things over and save face for the company like he always does. But everything I've written here is true - the company outwardly looks as if it prioritizes the culture and the overall wellbeing of employees, but it absolutely does not - it's all a carefully crafted illusion. The bottom line is this: writers, don't stop your job search once you get hired here. There are plenty of other options out there that will pay you what you're worth with a much more reasonable workload. Use the stress at this job as motivation to find a better one. And above all, don't let the terrible management make you lose passion for your craft. You deserve a job that treats you fairly, and you absolutely will not find it at HubShout.

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    Advice to Management

    PAY YOUR WRITERS WHAT THEY ARE WORTH. To try to justify the measly $12/hr pay by simply dismissing the writer's job as "entry level" is an egregious injustice and an absolute slap in the face to the writers, virtually all of whom have a minimum of a Bachelor's degree. Some of the job description itself can be categorized as an entry level position, but the workload is not, by any stretch of the imagination,... something anyone should expect at entry level. Give employees scheduled raises if you expect them to be on board with taking on extra tasks. Otherwise, they'll inevitably start to feel overworked, underappreciated, underpaid and 100% fed up. This must be a major contributing factor to the high writer turnover. The starting salary for this job should be $15/hr MINIMUM. The company can absolutely afford it.

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    HubShout2019-05-22

    HubShout Response

    May 25, 2019President

    Hi! Thanks for providing such thorough feedback. We are a values-driven company with a huge emphasis on mutual respect and listening. As such, we always welcome feedback - even when it is very negative. We have already shared your review freely within the company and had active discussions. "We eat failure for breakfast" is a credo and we mean it. We plan to have more discussions. We believe that our ability to stand in uncomfortable situations with mindfulness, a focus on listening, and honesty, is how you build a great company. Again - Thanks for this opportunity to face into your issues. We're so sorry you were so unhappy for so long. It is not what we wish for you, or anyone, in any job - but especially at HubShout. Where to start? Oh my! Firstly, it is no surprise to us that you were unhappy. We knew of your disengagement from the tribe for quite some time. It was frequently discussed on the team as many of us were worried for you. Devin, Danielle, Tim and I had many conversations about how we could do better. Account Managers would mention it and help us brainstorm. We explored what we were doing wrong and how we could better reach out to you. Many attempts at dialog were made, but communication remained a challenge and our relationship suffered. Despite our efforts, you were clearly unhappy, and we do not feel good about that at all. I’m sure we could have done better / more. As for the state of our company culture, we are confused by your feedback. Since you left 3 months ago, we completed our 13th quarterly Culture Survey (we use a tool from the University of Southern California). After 3 years of hard work on culture, the score finally reached a new high, putting us in the top 20% of employers. The assessment tool is completed anonymously and we get a very high participation rate. The data suggests our culture is the strongest it has been in 11 years. On the issue of compensation, we agree with you on many points. We have done a poor job building career paths that lead to meaningful income opportunities in the company. We are actively trying to fix this issue. Last year, an employee-lead team completely overhauled the Account Manager position, resulting in 3 levels of promotion path and higher pay. They also revamped the bonus structure. They were given immense autonomy and came up with very creative solutions that made the company more efficient - money that they saw directly in record-level bonuses. We’re very proud of what the Account Managers did last year. We are also proud to have paid bonuses for 7 years straight. We benchmark our bonuses against other companies and they are significantly above average. This year we have launched a new position called Matrix Team Leader, again to create promotion and income opportunities. We are particularly focused on Danielle’s aspiration of “creating more leadership positions for women” in the firm. Andrea was recently promoted into this position and she is simply amazing. Finally, for the last several months Melissa has been leading an initiative specifically for a promotion path for Writers, the very issue you have raised. I have been personally involved with many of those meetings and support her mission. While we’re not finished with the work, our track record is strong and we will find a solution. We’re also confused on your points about turnover. Turnover was a major issue for the firm several years ago. As the culture has improved, it has become almost non-existent. Again - we review this data regularly and have open discussions. Turnover at HubShout for the last 24 months has been extraordinarily low. Again, I’m so sorry you missed out on all of these opportunities and the amazing culture we are building at HubShout. I am deeply saddened by your review, and the anger you have toward us. We want you to know that we are listening intently, with compassion. I sincerely wish you the best in your new job and thank you for your feedback.

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  7. Helpful (1)

    "Entrepreneurial Spirit Rewarded"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Manager Within Operations in Rochester, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at HubShout full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    In digital marketing, an industry with massive uncertainty, HubShout has zeroed in on two key pillars over the past two or three years that have it poised to grow and thrive -- focus on culture above all else and, flowing from that, adoption of the Lean Startup methodology to validate what's working and build upon those things. The focus on culture started first, so we're further down that path -- and being... recognized for that. Over the past year, we have made tangible strides in our innovation methodology, and the learning is getting faster and sharper. We're much more customer-centric now, which is also leading to better results. The biggest pros in working at HubShout are: 1) The close-knit team of people at the core of what we do. The entire management group has been with the company 3+ years, and in many cases, much longer. This has led to much lower turnover throughout the team, as well as more clarity and consistency in everyone's jobs. Also, every member of the management team was promoted from within. We all worked in the functional roles we now manage. We also have close relationships with many of our customers, which makes serving them so much more rewarding. 2) The ability, which is strongly encouraged, to shape the direction of the company in both big and small ways. If you are looking to participate in helping to grow an already established company in the digital marketing space -- without putting up your own money or spending time pitching investors -- there is probably no better option in the Rochester area right now.

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    Cons

    With any pro there is inevitably a flip side to the coin. With the uncertainty in the search marketing space, there are ups and downs with customer turnover, uneven growth, etc. Some people aren't looking for uncertainty or don't want to be focused on solving problems in their daily work -- they'd rather be shown a process and pointed in a direction. Work input = reliable success. And that's fair if that's someone's... preference. Also, although the entrepreneurial risk is mitigated -- it's not your monetary investment at stake -- there is still a risk/reward scenario at play. The starting salary won't be at the top end of the spectrum. It takes time and results to reap the rewards of the company's success.

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    HubShout2019-03-10
  8. "If they are hiring apply!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Pay Per Click Analyst in Rochester, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at HubShout full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    The upper management is on the ground floor (metaphorically) with the entire company, there is complete transparency in everything they do not just with their employees but with their clients as well. The culture is ever growing and improving. The team truly feels like a family.

    Cons

    N/A I cannot think of any

    HubShout2018-12-19

    HubShout Response

    December 25, 2018President

    Hey - Thanks. We greatly appreciate the kind words. We try to be very open and honest - especially when it's not easy. We make plenty of mistakes, so much learning and growth still needed. We also know we are headed into a difficult year. However, this team is amazing and if there is any group of people who can pull it off - it's this tribe of incredibly dedicated, smart, warm, inclusive and creative folks. It's a real joy to work with shoulder-to-shoulder every day. Thanks again for your feedback. Merry Christmas!

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  9. "nice"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee 

    I worked at HubShout full-time

    Pros

    great coworkers, cool office space, opportunity for remote

    Cons

    pay is low, workload is high, not impossible tho. it's entry level so it's to be expected

    HubShout2018-11-30

    HubShout Response

    December 3, 2018President

    Hi! Thanks for the review. We love feedback. Glad to hear you bonded with the team here! Of course, that has been the norm for most. Our recent Culture Survey was the highest score we've ever seen. Also glad you liked the office space and our very liberal shift / work-from-home policies. The team has come up with some very radical ideas that help people with high amounts of freedom and autonomy. It is a high-trust environment with very few rules. Yes - We do work hard here. We try to be very very up-front about that in the interview. I'm hoping that wasn't a surprise. We are always pushing ourselves to create better (and higher paying) positions for our team. For example, the Account Manager team figured out how to reorganize themselves and get more done with less people - all of whom now make more money. We are actively looking for more opportunities like this in every position as we believe our people are critical to our success.

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  10. "Patience, Hard Work, and a Social Spirit Needed"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Content Writer 
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at HubShout full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Lots of social opportunities with a medium-size office full of friendly people. There are a few employees who don't participate in many social activities, but overall you'll enjoy the culture more if you get to know people. The workload is demanding, so procrastinators and slow writers beware. If you can handle the workload, the autonomy they give you is wonderful. Casual office as far as dress etc, but everyone is... serious about building and improving a good company culture and a successful business. Genuinely enthusiastic and welcoming atmosphere. They promote internally whenever possible. Most people in management besides the heads of the company started out as entry-level content writers. Everyone is very willing to mentor you and help you forge skills and a career path.

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    Cons

    Competitive pay and upward mobility are kind of limited right now since it's not a huge company. On the plus side, the company is developing specializations and micro-promotions, especially for content writers. Also, if you're mainly looking to pad your writing portfolio, this isn't necessarily the place for you. Since the company is white label, writers only get a byline for very select pieces and are essentially... ghost writers for the majority of their work.

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    HubShout2018-10-23

    HubShout Response

    October 29, 2018President

    Thank you very much for posting. We love feedback and believe that it allow us to grow stronger as a company. We are very glad our culture efforts are making the company experience more enjoyable... Thanks again!

Found 66 reviews