S&P Global FAQ

Have questions about working at S&P Global? Read answers to frequently asked questions to help you make a choice before applying to a job or accepting a job offer.

Whether it's about compensation and benefits, culture and diversity, or you're curious to know more about the work environment, find out from employees what it's like to work at S&P Global.

All answers shown come directly from S&P Global Reviews and are not edited or altered.

58 English questions out of 58

9 February 2021

Does S&P Global offer relocation assistance?

Pros

Good culture & environment, good incentives, good package, health benefits, friendly culture

Cons

Pressure No job security Job security

Advice to Management

Job security

Good culture & environment, good incentives, good package, health benefits, friendly culture

9 February 2021

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13 August 2019

Does S&P Global offer massages?

Pros

quarterly 15-minute massages, 4 weeks paid vacation, working remotely flexibility, nice and caring managers and employees

Cons

Notoriously underpays it's employees compared to other Price Reporting Agencies.

minute massages, 4 weeks paid vacation, working remotely flexibility, nice and caring managers and employees

13 August 2019

See answer

6 March 2021

Does S&P Global offer dental insurance?

Pros

Benefits - Management- Medical coverage - Leave policy - work life balance

Cons

less salary for non technical profile

Medical coverage

6 March 2021

See answer

24 March 2019

Does S&P Global offer parental leave?

Pros

- most people are pleasant to work with

Cons

- President of Rating division is from Pepsi. You draw your own conclusion. - Absolutely horrendous bonus for 2018. - this place attracts “certain” type of analysts: (1) fresh out of college who have no experience and want to use SP as a stepping stone to elsewhere (2) middle-aged analysts who may grow up at SP and have nowhere else to go because their skills are simply not good enough for anywhere else (and both they and next employer know it) - ie, they are stuck until they get laid off (3) those seeking to have the flexibility to get great work from home perk (many time, “not” work at all) or very long maternity and paternity leaves - ie, new and prospective parents. (4) those who are just content with status quo and unwilling to learn because they know ratings analysts can get by with minimum Level of knowledge that barely scratched the surface - this applies to junior and senior analysts. (5) very rarely you see some very dedicated analysts who truly like old fashioned research and go above and beyond. They may get recognized yes. But then an incompetent analyst from the previous four buckets can simply put in more years than you and STiLL get promoted to your level, just because they did not fxxx things up. So how does that make you feel?

Advice to Management

If you are not a “research shop” that rewards star analysts (or willing to hire skilled people), then don’t try to brand yourself as one. The market is Ok with you being that mediocre dinosaur with the duopoly power - people still come to you for ratings regardless how much your analysts suck. Many useless internal initiatives take up much time with no good result - just read the transcripts and search “Simplify” - see when did this initiative was first announced publicly and you’ll know.

ie, they are stuck until they get laid off (3) those seeking to have the flexibility to get great work from home perk (many time, “not” work at all) or very long maternity and paternity leaves

24 March 2019

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26 January 2021

Does S&P Global offer a wellness program?

Pros

Of course, with any company I'm sure a lot of the experience depends on the team and management structure that you fall into. I consider myself lucky as I got put on a new and fast growing team. Around the year mark, I was promoted to Senior Engineer and received a 12% raise. Additional Pros: - no micromanagement - mid year and year-end reviews which are tied to a raise/bonus structure - 2 week long support shifts every 2 months or so, which I think is rare for engineers supporting Production infrastructure. - My team had employees in both US and APAC regions, meaning even when I was on support I never had to worry about issues occurring late in the evening or in the middle of the night - competitive pay - incredible benefits right off the bat: 4 weeks PTO, ~10 fully paid holidays, you get your birthday off, 401k and health insurance, "mental health" days, Wellness funds, etc - great work culture from the top down Again, I realize that other employees who don't fall under the same management structure as me might not have the same experience as far as career growth and freedom

Cons

Lots of mergers, re-orgs, upper level management changes and rearranging. This happened often and of course always gives employees the feeling of "am I redundant? Will I lose my job". I'm sure this is standard across most if not all large enterprises though.

Advice to Management

Keep doing a good job and showing that your employees are cared for. With the current benefit and pay structure, I believe you will continue to be able to find and retain great talent.

incredible benefits right off the bat: 4 weeks PTO, ~10 fully paid holidays, you get your birthday off, 401k and health insurance, "mental health" days, Wellness funds, etc

26 January 2021

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58 English questions out of 58

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